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Thread: Traditional Art

  1. #1
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    Traditional Art

    I know this forum is for Artrage and digital art, but come on, we surely must do some traditional art.
    I want to show you my drawings, because other forums aren't as...well, like a sort of 'second-family' you're all so kind and caring, and other forums are too, but on here, we know each other and we aren't flooded with people we have no idea who they are.
    I do a lot of traditional art. :3
    And I love it, and I want to show you some of my drawings.
    Shoe for school - http://i161.photobucket.com/albums/t...t_20091016.jpg
    Paintbrush/Palette for school - http://i161.photobucket.com/albums/t...20091011_5.jpg
    Front page of my sketchbook - http://i161.photobucket.com/albums/t...20091011_3.jpg
    Second page of my sketchbook - http://i161.photobucket.com/albums/t...t_20091015.jpg

    That's all I have to share for now, but maybe you have lots!
    Share them here!

    (P.S. I'm in the middle of a painting right now, and it's close to finished. Expect to see it up in the gallery soon. )
    (P.S.S. Sorry for terrible quality. I had to take the pictures with my webcam!)

  2. #2
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    i love the lil pencil super hero. lol Before i got my tablet and artrage i always drew and painted in the traditional form but now i find the "real" pencil and brush to fill a little strange and foreign. I know thats terrible but i never draw unless its on my computer. The mess and the fact that there is no undo button keeps me on the computer. lol

    *Sweedie- I agree 100% its all about contrast.
    my work- gusion85.deviantart.com

  3. #3
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    Cool sketches

    I really liked the winged heart and the shoe! Nice idea sharing some the real world stuff. Thanks for sharing it.

  4. #4
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    While I can't dispute the value (pun intended) of the comments about pushing contrast, I also know that the normal graphite pencil used in school goes only so dark as opposed to charcoal pencils and so on. I remember in rendering classes that we were to use graphite. But the brave among us got into using workable fixative which essentially aerosol sprays from a can a little clear varnish like layer that when dry allows you to put more layers over the old graphite. It's stuff you generally don't want to breathe. Some odorless hair sprays work as well. But you would want to test it to see if it turns your paper with a yellow brown stain.

    And if you get soft enough graphite, it will eventually get dark, though as I recall it never got black. Graphite is great to work with though even though it didn't go black. I used to love it probably because it was more of a gray and I could then paint over it with thin washes in some cases, letting the line show through. It was a popular illustrator style back when I was getting into the business in the 70s.

    Anyway, that value thing is emblematic of the medium. And if you want to go for black, you need perhaps a different mark maker like charcoal, conte crayon or prisma color pencils etc. You'll have a blast exploring the different tools for mark making.

    And yes. Contrast is usually good. Problem is that if you make a mistake it's pretty apparent. And that's why many people like graphite. Plus it is usually pretty easily erasable. But on the other hand, if you know that mistakes will loom large, you may be spurred on to draw better and better so it's no longer an issue. People who draw in pen and ink tend to come into a sureness with their marks owing to the unforgiving quality of the black ink on white paper.

    Okay, having said that, use whatever tools you can latch onto. And there's nothing wrong with the ol' #2 pencil in a sketchbook. The important thing is to keep drawing. You have been. And it looks great. I personally love the more whimsical stuff because I still doodle like that. My mind just sort of spills it out when I have pencil in hand during a lecture or something. And often times the images really do tell me what is rolling around in the back of my head and sort of symbolically represents those impressions from the lecture for example. Kinda cool.

    Anyway, I agree with the others. And you're doing great. Keep up the wonderful work.
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  5. #5
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    Hi weeun,
    from your 'terrible quality' rendering of your drawings I steel can see the good rendering of the shoe, you did use different values and the stronger one is on the label, perhaps a more classical expression would be with this deep black on some edges and what you consider being in the shadow,
    in the third image I like the fighting pen, it have good contrasts in it.

    There are all kind of styles of drawing and all kind of uses for it, you don't make a sketch for your own remembering as you would do for an architectural project or a cartoon or a classical drawing, etc,
    you may try to exercise the different styles if you like.

    Is also possible to draw with brush and ink as D Akey mentioned but I think that this is the most difficult art to do and the masters in the field are the Asian artists ,
    of cause , all depends of what you want to do later on and of your taste and abilities.

    I agree with the "don't be weak" from Sweedie , I think that comes in time,
    more your exercise more you will be sure of your drawings but I will add ,
    and is also very important, don't be mechanical in the execution,
    is what comes to many after years of executions , they know so well what they want to do that at a certain point it became an industry and Art is
    more artisan than industry, I can't explain better but I think you can understand my personal point of view, perhaps is not the best but is sincere and I can't say better.
    "All are about quiet and light." Dany
    Daily Studio Notes , Daniela Ionesco-Fine Art

    I accept critics only from friends,
    how about You ?

  6. #6
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    Thank you all for your comments on my artwork.
    I didn't mention this before, but all of the artwork in my sketchbook was done with a mechanical pencil, and the outline/sketch of the shoe was done in mechanical pencil too, then I took a 4B and a 2B and shaded it.
    The reason the shoe was so light was because the shoe is white, and I was in a well-lit room, and because it was bright in there, I didn't add much shadow, for fear I'd mess it up, so I drew what I saw.
    The label/writing is a blacker kind because when I viewed it from above, it stood out in much more contrast.
    The paintbrush/palette drawing was done in a slightly darkened room, and the sketchbook ones were done during class and in my free time.
    I know mechanical pencils are viewed upon as 'not fit for drawing' by some artists, I actually prefer them. Without the constant need to sharpen, after a few uses, even if it was just scribbles on paper, the lead goes blunt and it's perfect for shading/drawing. I use the sharpened tip for fine details and I tilt the pencil slightly to get the best use of the blunt end.
    My art teacher told me to never use a mechanical pencil, unless it was for writing or architecural purposes.
    I think she'd kill me if she knew I used a mechanical pencil for art often, so I won't tell her.
    There wasn't a need to point out that I used a mechanical pencil, as it doesn't lessen my abilities or anything, but the only reason I pointed it out was because a lot of artists think it's hard or near impossible to get good results with a mechanical pencil, and I just wanted to prove them wrong, and show that art can come in any form, using any medium, from dirt, to pencil, to stone, even to grass, if you feel like it!
    Again, I thank you for your wonderful comments.

  7. #7
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    Sweedie, you definitely have different graphite school pencils than I've ever seen. As you know 2B merely means softness, so you could also have a 2B charcoal pencil or graphite etc. I'm not familiar with that brand.

    On my screen that's black. If it had been done with the 2B pencils I know, the contrast on the scanned image would have to have been adjusted to go this dark. Plus you know there can be variances among computer monitors, so it could be appearing darker. PC generated images on Macs tend to go darker.

    So yeah, if you can get black from a normal school pencil, go for it! But anyone can see for themselves what they can get with the available pencils and your demo shows what they should be going after. If it gets blackish, then that's what matters. The ultimate point is that good contrast is often desirable, especially when learning and getting a handle on the spectrum from black to white.

    Very nice exercise and sample!
    Last edited by D Akey; 10-19-2009 at 03:44 AM.
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  8. #8
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    Pencil grades vary from manufacturer to manufacturer, alas. I've encountered HB pencils which were blacker (and left a nicer texture) than most 2B pencils. Faber-Castell leads, for instance, are noticeably harder than average in my experience. So your mileage may vary.

    To get a deeper black, you can always draw in black wax pencil. I certainly recommend this method.

    Another way, if you use graphite, is to use several pencils of varying softness. Use B or even H for the lightest shades, 2B to 4B for midtone range, and go down to 8B for the deepest black. Works like charm.

  9. #9
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    You are an artiste Sweedie , no doubt but I can't stop remembering the Mr. Van G. shoes

    I just discovered a beautiful drawing and wanted to share with you :
    Hada Lina by Uriolus,
    of course , all is about taste and perception,
    I can't say why I am receptive to that portrait, I just like it !
    Last edited by Dany51; 10-19-2009 at 08:34 PM.
    "All are about quiet and light." Dany
    Daily Studio Notes , Daniela Ionesco-Fine Art

    I accept critics only from friends,
    how about You ?

  10. #10
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    A 2B has always beenone of my favorites. I also cheat and use a mechanical size 7 or 9 pencil with a 2B lead. Also the mechanical pencil with a 2B lead works fine.
    My drawing books always include a mechanical lead holder. with a 2B lead. It is the lead that does the drawing not the pencil. I really don't think the way the lead is held should make a difference unless you must do everything exactly according to the book and then it is not really art.
    Just my thoughts.
    Keep up the good work. Remember. Practice, practice,practice.

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