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Thread: (Solved) What is that technique called?

  1. #1
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    Question (Solved) What is that technique called?

    Back in my Kindergarten times we used a special technique to "paint" pictures. First we would take a blank piece of paper and fill it with random bright colours (coloured pencils) then we would take a black wax crayon and cover the whole page so nothing could be seen any more. After that we would take a tooth-pick and scratch away lines through the wax and the bright colours would shine through.

    Eventually this would lead to a mostly black picture consisting of colourful lines.

    Does anybody know what I am babbling about? Is there a name for this?

    FWIW: It is easily possible to recreate that effect in AR 2.5 by simply adding a layer (filled with black wax) and using the eraser tool.
    Last edited by Andro; 09-27-2009 at 11:21 AM.

  2. #2
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    I've never known a name for it either.

    The way I did it in 3rd grade or something was we entirely covered the paper with random waxy crayon colors and then the teacher or somebody brushed over it with black india ink I think, And once it dried we used it like a scratch board as you described.

    Was really fun and sadly we only ever did it the once.
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  3. #3
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    It is called a scratchboard. Yep, it works in artrage. Lay down some colors. Paint a new layer of paint over in black and then erase away the black layer. Keep a sketch layer to remember where your colors are perhaps. I tried it once. It was kind of difficult for me. But it was loads of fun in first grade or so.

    http://www.scratchboard-art.com/inte.../naquaiya.html
    Last edited by screenpainter; 09-26-2009 at 06:51 PM.

  4. #4
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    Hi Andro,

    Found it! My favourite way of working, doing some now as a matter of fact. Several pieces in my Gallery.

    "Another use of scraffito is seen in its simplified painting technique. One coat of paint is left to dry on a canvas or sheet of paper. Another coat of a different color is painted on top of the first layer. The artist then uses a palette knife or oil stick to scratch out a design, leaving behind an image in the color of the first coat of paint. Sometimes a first coat of paint is not needed and the wet coat scraped back reveals the canvas. This technique is often used in art classes to teach the scraffito technique to novice art students."

    From the Net someplace, never knew it had a name.

    Phil
    Last edited by Aged P; 09-26-2009 at 09:29 PM.
    Luck is infatuated with the efficient.

  5. #5
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    Smile

    Gee, many thanks to you, D Akey, gzairborne and Aged P! A lifelong mystery has been solved.

    Very impressing pictures, Aged P!
    Last edited by Andro; 09-27-2009 at 11:24 AM.

  6. #6
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    I'm not sure if this will help, but I have played with a similar technique using the roller on a bottom layer. I used 20% pressure, 10% thinning, 78% loading. Use the highest metallic setting. Just roll whatever colors you want on the bottom layer, more colors the better. On a second layer use the roller at the same settings to lay down a layer of black and then use the eraser tool to "etch" what ever designs or lines you wish. I've also tried using metallic glitter on the bottom layer. Interesting effects. It's kind of fun and relaxing.

    I followed the link that gzairborne added. What an interesting type of art work. I tell you if that guy from Publisher's Clearing House finally gets to my door with that big check, I am chucking my day job and I'm going to pursue art simply because it excites me. I often could kick myself for never having had the courage to go after an art education instead of the business course. Thank goodness for Art Rage.
    Last edited by Bobbi; 10-01-2009 at 05:09 AM.

  7. #7
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    The real thing

    Hi Andro,

    As part of my life long "declutter the house" program, I just came across this. It was doodled years ago using a needle held in a clutch pencil. It's about 9" x 5" and shows the amazing detail you can achieve with the technique. It was once used for doing Museum drawings and Precision Engineering stuff. The back of it says it was called Scraper Board although I think it was marketed as Scratch board in the US. Artrage can match it easily now.

    Phil
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    Luck is infatuated with the efficient.

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