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Thread: Flower and Raindrop SOS!!!!!!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    10

    Flower and Raindrop SOS!!!!!!

    I have been working on this flower, using the reference attached, and I have found myself happy with the current color of the flower...

    ...but I just don't know how to get that texture of the flower, with the "lines" soft of. I have been messing around with different techniques to do this, but I just can't get it just right. Are there any suggestions that you have for making the texture like it is in the reference?

    ...also, I just don't know where to start with the raindrops. Does anyone care to try to explain to me how to do raindrops? Does anyone have/know of any tutorials that may help me with this?

    Thanks, all help is greatly appreciated!
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    If it's not fun you're doing it wrong.
    -George Di Carlo

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Australia
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    2,830
    great start



    ....for my 2c advice with things like rain drops the most important thing is to paint em the colour they 'actually are' rather than the colour you 'know' they are ie clear ...beause they are clear they are showing the colour underneath them and reflecting a bit of what is above ie whiiteish sky colours.

    as for lines...for me id start putting in the fine detail in in pencil...but thats just how i work others would approach differently



    ...hope it helps
    "I like to have a thing suggested rather than told in full. When every detail is given, the mind rests satisfied, and the imagination loses the desire to use its own wings."
    ~Thomas Bailey Aldrich~

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    New Jersey
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    498

    Fantastic Start

    Hi Cbaer, That is a fantastic start! Wonderful use of color. I agree with Selby about how to proceed. You might want to build on your base color though with some crayon or color pencil, or whatever medium suits you best until you have refined it to the tones in the picture. That is unless you want to leave the colors as they are. And they are absolutely wonderful! Aside from that, for me, I would proceed in a similar manner to what Selby suggested. One thing which might help though, is a little quiet time before you paint to just relax and let everything else drift away from your mind. Then a little concentration excercise. Stare at my little box image. We will call it your "focus cube." You've probably drawn one of these before. Stare at the "dot" inside the box. Don't stare at the lines of the box. Don't stare at the colors of the lines of the box. Only focus on the dot, until the box seems to change position. It's the same way with painting. Our minds trick us into seeing an illusion of "what we know" of an image. Focus only on the area you want to work with. If you want to refine the colors in your flower, then focus in on those colors in the photo. Choose one area at the time. When you get ready to paint those raindrops, focus on one raindrop at the time and stare at it until you see the "reflections" in that raindrop. Paint the reflections. You will see detail in the flower inside the raindrops because the raindrops are clear. Paint the detail of the flower inside the raindrop. Focus on the edges of the raindrop, which are a darker reflective color of the area they are lying on. Paint that reflective color. One artist years ago who was a teacher of Andrew Wyeth said something like this, "...throw yourself into the painting...feel the wind in your hair...feel the rain on your face..." There is no right or wrong way to create art. You have to search for the way that is best for you. I have other concentration excercises that I learned in "Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain," an excellent book for learning how to capture what we see instead of what we know about images. It gives scientific data to back up the theories in the book. Basically, the "left side of our brains" draw from "memory," and the right side observes lines and spaces. The left brain likes to name the various parts of an image. The right side only deals with the image presented, so to speak. I used the book many years ago and it greatly eased the frustrations associated with trying to draw from memory," which is an automatic, subconscious process unless one learns how to avoid this. When I purchased the book I had already mastered drawing in most areas, but I wanted to perfect my art and learn new techniques. Later, I used it as one of the books I taught out of at a local arts center in my hometown. Even though it focuses on drawing instead of painting, the relaxation and concentration excersises are fantastic. My creativity exploded after I used the book and I started a small business soon after, which turned into a fashion design enterprise. Also, one day when I happened to be visiting my doctor I had the book with me and he confided in me how he had used the book and it greatly enhanced his organizational skills. Anyhoo, I hope this helps!
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    Last edited by cathyd; 06-18-2009 at 07:10 AM.
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Virginia
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    i would start by blending your colors more, just making it smoother with the palette knife and then using the crayons to start building texture. the i would go in with the airbrush for the lines and the drops of water. just keep trying to build up more texture with blending and adding,blending,adding, u get the picture save the detail for last. you can go back in with the colors to make it brighter once ur done blending. airbrush and crayon should help alot with this in my opinion. buts thats just how i would do.
    my work- gusion85.deviantart.com

  5. #5
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    Feb 2009
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    Good Advice

    Yes, Chambersecrets. I agree. I'm so glad you mentioned blending with the palette knife. I forgot to. Blending is definitely key. Very good advice indeed.
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  6. #6
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    Off to a great start here! Just follow the suggestions already mentioned, finding the method that best suits you, and there you are.

    I donŽt know anything about focus cubes or anything like that, though the idea seems a good one. IŽd suggest just being patient and not trying to force anything. Work slowly until you get to where you want to be. That should help.
    The only problem with humor is that no one takes it seriously.

  7. #7
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    True

    Great advice, Scott. True indeed.
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    Oh, look we are in Kansas Toto.
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    Here's a link for water droplets...

    http://www2.ambientdesign.com/forums...ad.php?t=19194

    Hope it helps.

    The way I did this...
    http://www2.ambientdesign.com/forums...ad.php?t=19175

    I just used pencil (as was previously mentioned), sooth it out and repeat again and again and again...

    Big suggestion, find YOUR WAY. Again as previously mentioned, I do something one way and that might not work for you. Take your time and find "your voice" in the paint.

    Great start, keep it up and post some progress shots for us.
    J. Little
    I'm no artist, just a junkie with a pencil...
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    You can check out my photography on...
    http://www.anganjohnphoto.com
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