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Thread: the hallway

  1. #1

    Question the hallway

    all the time I find myself doodling something very similar to this without even paying attention. so I figured I should turn it into a real (well digital) piece. I have the basic design already painted, and the painting on the far wall pretty much done, except for maybe some detail in the picture and frame, but I can't think of where to go next. any ideas?
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  2. #2
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    One of the tricks to see if you have a good composition is to cover up one half of the image, and see if it's still (over all) interesting. Then check the other half, both horizontal and vertically. Looking at the bottom half, I'm thinking maybe some design/pattern in the carpet to lead your eye into the painting?

    Honestly, though, this immediately reminded me of some ancient video games... sorry... but it does bring back some good memories :-)
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  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by yachris View Post
    One of the tricks to see if you have a good composition is to cover up one half of the image, and see if it's still (over all) interesting. Then check the other half, both horizontal and vertically. Looking at the bottom half, I'm thinking maybe some design/pattern in the carpet to lead your eye into the painting?

    Honestly, though, this immediately reminded me of some ancient video games... sorry... but it does bring back some good memories :-)
    lol it reminds me of old video games too...

    I think I'm going to make it into an art gallery - paintings on the walls, chandelier hanging from the ceiling. anyone have any tips for good omni lighting (coming from a small, central source like a lamp instead of daylgiht lighting)

  4. #4
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    Hey berky...cool concept. Maybe start with a dark canvas and slowly increase your values where you want the viewers eyes to roam in the art gallary. It reminds of the stories of Picasso and how he had little peep holes drilled into the walls of his studio so he could watch the viewers reactions to his work (don't know if that is true or not). Come to think of it...That's kinda what we do here...LOL.
    "The significance is hiding in the insignificant. Appreciate everything."
    Eckhart Tolle

  5. #5
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    Hey there Berky93,

    Looking at your "simple" but terrific painting, I'm reminded of the signature Rob-In-Denver uses in his posts, the fabulous quote from William Merrit Chase:
    "It takes two to paint. One to paint, and the other to stand by with an axe to kill him before he spoils it."
    In all sincerity, I find wholeness in this image as is. With trepidation, I see a couple of things I might play with, suggesting each with a "perhaps", test it, and throw it out if it depletes the juice in this optically powerful little graphic. So here's some simple "perhaps":

    1. Try some slight value differences between the left, right and back walls (same hue, just different values between walls). Proceed with caution.
    2. Make the frame on the painting on the back wall have a very clean execution consistent with the rigid cleanness of the balance of the painting.
    3. Try some different sizes and shapes and colors in the painting on the back wall. These are just to see if you land on alternatives that accentuate the extreme isolation and loneliness, almost the absurdity of the scene. ((A side note: I'm reminded here of walking into so many Modern Art museums that have a huge space, probably bigger than my house, devoted to one painting (often one that doesn't seem to warrant so much particular special attention), finding myself wondering how much it cost just to heat and light the room, and how many other terrific paintings could be hanging on those walls for me to enjoy given the price of admission.)) I think the size and shape you have now is about right, and even the colors, but it's something to play with and see how it hits you optically and emotionally. Go with whatever seems most "right".
    4. That's about it.
    Of course, there are a zillion directions you could go, and I like both your and Sketch's directions - wonderful possibilities in each. But if you go with any of them, why not take them on as completely new projects, while preserving this painting (MAYBE with some small alterations), printing it out, and hanging it on a wall as the complete and whole little piece of terrificness that it is? No kidding. I like it.

    That's my two cents. Have a hell of a good time no matter what you do

    - Cheers, Byron
    // "Appreciation fosters well-being. Be well." - Byron
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  6. #6
    thanks for the tips - I'm going to try changing the color slightly on the walls. as for the frame on the back painting, I noticed the frame was a little bit off as well. I think its because I only used rulers as a guide to make straight lines, but not to make the edges flat, I'm going to go back and do that.

    actually, I think it would be better if I just used this image as a reference and re-did the painting on a bigger canvas, to allow for more detail in the small picture.

    anyway, thanks again!

  7. #7
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    Terrific. This painting would be most effective reproduced at a large size, so that seems a great direction. Terrific to use AR to work out your color expierments for a final reference.

    Maybe you can post a phograph of you standing beside the painting hung on a wall when it's done .

    Best,
    Byron
    // "Appreciation fosters well-being. Be well." - Byron
    //
    My ArtRage Paintings Here
    // My Comprehensive AR4 & 3 Thread Here
    64 bit Win8Pro, 16GB Ram, Intel i7 Quad Core - 8 threads; Wacom Intuios 4

  8. #8
    well I tried making it on a larger canvas (3 times the largest preset), and I cleaned up the lines (no more outlines, less cartoony that way) I also tried changing the right wall's color to be slightly darker than the left one, and the back wall has a slightly different color as well. I like it a lot better this way. I haven't put a painting on the back wall yet, but I like the progress so far.

    attached is the new pic, along with one with my pencil sketch layer enabled, I figure maybe that will help someone who is even less experienced than me understand convergence points.

    after comparing this to my original image from the top of the thread, I definitely see an improvement. I must remember to not leave unclean lines like that. although the lack of smoothness in the ceiling I couldn't fix, for some reason one of my brush strokes decided it wanted to be set on auto-dry...

    Any suggestions as to what I should put in the painting on the wall? I like playing with the idea of loneliness as it really fits the theme of the painting.

    EDIT: I just noticed that because I had to reduce the image size in photoshop so the file size was small enough to be uploaded the lines aren't quite as smooth - they get lighter and slightly blurry. It's not like that in the real thing.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by berky93; 04-03-2009 at 03:18 PM.

  9. #9
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    lookin good berky!
    "The significance is hiding in the insignificant. Appreciate everything."
    Eckhart Tolle

  10. #10
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    Hey Berky,

    Hmm, I like your revised direction. For sure keep going – I’m most curious to see where you’ll take it.

    But I do hope that you’ll also keep your original painting and hang it on a wall, maybe experimenting with the few minor touches we outlined to see whether or not they work.

    There are things in the first painting that work beautifully in the context of that specific effort that I think are worth preserving, not necessarily in a new version, but in keeping the original version as a whole and complete painting in and of itself, regardless of revised departures. These include:

    1. The rich and balanced color, including the considerably darker floor. The somewhat more pastel look in the revisions may work wonderfully in your new project. But the colors in the original deliver an emotional weight that is fantastically right for that original exercise.

    2. The black lines at the wall junctures. They are so “wrong” they are perfectly “right”. They are powerful optical guideposts almost forcing the classical perspective to register in my guts. It particularly works that the lines are, while perfectly straight, imperfect in width and a little jagged or halting. They somehow help suggest there is a real person who made an artistic choice that connects you, the artist, to the viewer. That might seem strange, but it works in this painting.

    3. The paint texture evident in the walls, and ESPECIALLY the stray brushstrokes in the ceiling that didn’t level: They enhance the experience that it is a painting and not just a computer generated space layout constructed in Visio (for example). Likewise the painterly texture provides a greater sense of volume and weight. It make me think “painting” and connects me to the artist’s construction methods. The obvious appearance of paint connects the painting to a specific artist (you), something that is less evident in the more graphic-design oriented and flat revisions. All that texture works – it delivers a more visceral experience out of the painting and of the artist who created it

    4. The greater depth in the back wall is much more powerful for what struck me as the near absurdity, isolation, emptiness, and loneliness that the original painting evokes. The closer back wall in the revisions (at least currently) looses the vast sense of “emptiness”, and mitigates the shear absurdity of the lone painting in such a vast space.

    I’m struggling a bit here, but the closest I can put my finger on it is that the first version has soul that could be inadvertently revised out (if that makes any sense ). So whatever you do with a revised direction, I urge you to also keep that first painting, and following a few very minor adjustments to print it out big and hang it on a wall.

    Meanwhile, I’ll look forward to watching your new exploration take shape.

    Best, Byron
    // "Appreciation fosters well-being. Be well." - Byron
    //
    My ArtRage Paintings Here
    // My Comprehensive AR4 & 3 Thread Here
    64 bit Win8Pro, 16GB Ram, Intel i7 Quad Core - 8 threads; Wacom Intuios 4

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