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Thread: Canvas Size

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    6

    Canvas Size

    Hi everyone, I hope you're all well. I know that there are already a few threads regarding canvas size but I'm trying to figure out what dimensions I should use if I want do do A3 sized prints. I've looked all over the internet for the true dimensions for A3 but keep finding differing measurements. Also can the canvas/print size be changed after the painting is finished if one decides to print at a different size. Thanks for your help and take care.

  2. #2
    Here's a Wikipedia page regarding paper sizes:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paper_size

    An A3 is defined as being 297mm x 420mm (or rounded off - 11.7in x 16.5in).

    However, that's just the starting point. Next up is the resolution, or number of pixels that fit within that container size. You could use 300 pixels per inch for high resolution work that will be printed to magazines, 150 pixels per inch for high quality output to ink jet type printers.

    72 pixels per inch has been a good level of resolution for internet display, however, larger flat screen monitors are becoming more normal - so a higher resolution might actually be the wave of the future. The smaller resolution (72ppi) still has the advantage of creating a smaller file size, which loads more quickly across the internet.

    Larger file sizes (i.e. bigger dimensions and resolutions) might be taxing on your computer and on ArtRage. The slowest to calculate for me (and most people) is the Pallet Knife. Smear colors across a huge canvas and then go get a cup of coffee while your screen updates! LOL.

    As far as changing resolution, you can definitely resize DOWN in Photoshop, which averages pixels and can give you smaller dimensions or resolutions. Trying to resize UP forces the computer to try and interpolate to create the missing pixels that fall into the empty spaces between existing pixels. There are a few specialized plug-ins for Photoshop that do this better than others (Genuine Fractals comes to mind)

    http://www.ononesoftware.com/product...e_fractals.php

    However, in general, resizing up is NOT reccomended.

    Hope this helps.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    6
    Thanks a lot for the reply Kurt, it's definitely helped. All the best.

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