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Thread: I'm getting an epson 4880 17" printer and...

  1. #1
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    I'm getting an epson 4880 17" printer and...

    i did the math and it makes sense to to purchase it because I have an art show in 7 months and the cost per print is about $100-130 and up for archival prints mounted. I am going to print at least 8 painting at 16x24x200DPI and about 15-20 more of smaller sizes 8x10 and 16x12 etc.

    If anyone needs museum archival prints let me know and we can make a deal .

  2. #2
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    If you are not familiar with color calibrating a system, you should look into before you spend a lot of time (and money on paper and ink) trying to figure out how to get the screen and print images to match. This will be particularly true if you are printing for others.

    Forgive me for stating the obvious if you are already familiar with this, but for those that are not: color calibrating a system typically entails the use of hardware and software the ensures that the colors seen on your screen match those that come out of your printer. On a broader scale, this would also include calibrating any sources of images, as well - such as scanners.

    Using a sensor on your monitor, software helps you adjust the colors you see on screen so that they are as close to what they should as possible. Leveraging a different type of sensor, you print samples of various colors with your printer and read (using the sensor) the colors that are printed. The software creates a profile for the combination of paper and ink that you printed that adjusts each printout so that it is also as accurate as possible.

    You need a profile for each paper/ink combination you use, as the color of the paper and the chemical interaction between paper and ink change with each combination. A simple example would be printing a picture on paper that has a yellow tint versus one that has a blue tint to it. The profiling process will ensure that the colors output by the printer are adjusted to reflect the color cast of the paper. Papers with different texture, gloss/matte, material (wood pulp, cotton, canvas, parchment), and coatings (chemicals that help the ink adhere to the paper) each have different properties and therefore profile needs.

    A lot of people have challenges with color calibration and the steps required in their workflow to manage color. It can be challenging, especially if any part of the process is not calibrated or if the system has two components that try to adjust at the same time. Imagine if you let your printer adjust for the paper, but you also told Photoshop to do so. You'll end up double adjusting, creating a whole new problem that can be hard to track down.

    Best wishes, and enjoy your new printer!

    David
    Last edited by drzeller; 12-08-2008 at 05:42 PM.
    David Z

  3. #3
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    I get my prints done here
    https://www.pixeloutpost.com/Default.aspx?p=start
    I pay about $56 for unmounted, 12x18 and 16x24 giclee prints on archival paper. My local frame shop mounts for about $10.

  4. #4
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    Hi Robert I have and love the Epson R1800 and use it with my Mac, it's pretty old at this point too but still works flawlessly with Art Rage and all the Adobe APS. I have not used color calibration other than what came with the software and on my Mac... I'm sure I could do more but I'm very, very happy with the resulting prints. I hope you love your machine... once you start printing your own, though, there will be no stopping you, there is where the expense comes in, so hopefully you will sell a lot of prints, so you can keep yourself in ink and paper, my favorite paper is the Presentation Matte Heavyweight. Many people like the glossy but my work looks crisp and smooth on matte.

    Cheers, Susan

  5. #5
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    I had a large Epson Stylus Pro 4000 printer for a while from the company I
    am working for. We did not make printings on canvas, but I can tell you the
    used paper quality leads to a completly different printing result.

    Unfortunatly you get the best results with the expensive Epson papers.
    The printer has color profiles for every Epson paper quality.

    The weird thing is we used different sorts of paper which were all quite
    similar white, but using the wrong paper setting led to extremly different
    results. The were completly blue. First I thought some color tanks where
    empty, but they were not.

    If you use non Epson paper you should print some test stripes on the same
    sheets and write down all setting carefully or you will get lost in thousands of
    color settings.

    When you are lucky you have a Mac. ;-) Under Windows XP color
    mangement is a pain and it differs between Home and Professional.
    Believe me, we already had a lot of fun with this stuff. ;-)

    I have 2 monitors, several scanners, several software and some printers
    and you have a lot possibilities to combine settings

    Windows XP only supports color management of one monitor in theorie and
    every software shows an image differently not to mention that all cheap
    (less than 800$) TFT panels can't be really calibrated anyway. Very cheap
    6-bit panels never ever.

    With a Mac you have more luck because OSX provides color management
    and if you monitors are calibrated all images look the same on them and in
    every software too. So my next project will be a Hackintosh.

    Regards. (Javascript sucks)
    Kunst muss nicht immer kompliziert sein!

  6. #6
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    well I sent some print off to Where Robert suggested to and will see how they come out. I was outbid on the Epson 4880. So I think I can wait another week to spare me the $1200 bill for the printer.

    David - Yeah I'm very familiar with profiling using Qimage RIP and Profile Prism with a 48 bit scanner. Time consuming but well worth the effort. I have several months before I need to print so I going to wait on the large purchase for now.

    Robert - thanks for the info.

  7. #7
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    Outbid... things always happen for a reason! Perhaps you are destined to get something better or less expensive!

    Happy Holidays,
    David
    David Z

  8. #8
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    Got the print from Pixeloutpost.com and a tiff @ 26x24x200dpi came out ok. I think I will ask them for the ICC profile of the paper they use and the printer. This should help dial in the print

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