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Thread: Seacane Station

  1. #21
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    Apr 2007
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    washington, usa
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    This looks amazing. One question... where did you get those blue rulers?
    Are rulers customizable? or did you make your own, or is the Mac version different?

  2. #22
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    Oct 2007
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    Thanks again to everyone. Blue ruler-is-guide" mode. -allows your to easily draw lines. might click on ruler stencil and select guide.

    also-making more 'progress
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Name:	seacane 10.JPG 
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ID:	17735  

  3. #23
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    OK. One more update then I must got some sleep!
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Name:	seacane 11.JPG 
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ID:	17736  

  4. #24
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    Feb 2008
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    Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina
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    Im loving the step-through process. And I might say, this is becoming the best thing of yours Ive seen. (Not to say that your other things were bad.) It has a life that is palpable. Im so ready to see the finished version! Great job Jim!
    The only problem with humor is that no one takes it seriously.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
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    23,955
    Hi Jim,

    This attachment is a quickie to show what I'm talking about. It may have nothing to do with the way the station area is constructed for real, because in the real world the ground is not always flat, and not everything is constructed at right angles.

    But if it isn't that way, those irregularities can become pretty confusing as to what is being described, and it can look 'wrong' in a painting. In photos, and in real life nobody would question what is going on and if it is correct.

    Architectural renderings that are painted and drawn were often times simplified into making sense and following a simple structure. And that's how I'm addressing it, since that's what you seem to be studying.

    I moved some lines around to give it more structure as a technical artist might construct a scene like this.

    1) Things that are aligned like the street will vanish in about the same place.

    2) Lighting from the sun (as opposed to artificial light) will cast parallel shadows -- at the same angle. So the shadow from the bus and from a phone pole, and from a building should be following the same line away from the light source. But then once on the ground, especially if they are linear and there are perpendicular lines (like the cross piece on the phone pole), these would also vanish according to the things that are going on with them (could get really complex and distracting, which is a good reason to simplify).

    3) Simplification allows you to set a structure that can be exploited for dramatic effect. Shadow patterns and where they lead the eye can make for a great device for composition and focusing the viewer's attention on the star of the show.

    4) Mind the lens distortion. It doesn't translate very well to paintings and since it breaks the rules (or has it's own sensibility that is a bear to manage in a painting), it will draw inordinate attention to itself -- check out the phone pole leaning out of the scene. It looks like it's about to fall over, and that really steals the show.

    5) If you set up, or identify a structure based on lighting and so on, you can then plot out how shadows would impact the picture. This would allow you to insert objects/buildings etc into your painting convincingly. You can know what side of the building would do well to darken, how the shadow would fall, over what form of surface like asphalt, then lumpy grass, then creep up a wall, etc.

    6) Generally for picture making, and this has nothing to do with perspective per say, remember that when you create areas of high contrast, the eye will go to those places. So things like the shadow and light under the bus may be getting a little overly active. The vehicle has been painted in a very splashy way by the bus company, so there's not a lot you can do with that other than perhaps cheat the ground a bit by making it somehow less contrasty, and be more selective about what you CHOOSE to put in the picture. That's part of the art of it. That kind of thing designers consider all the time in the movies, even though it's not something that one usually wants the viewer to get distracted by how pretty it is, unless that is the point of the shot. We usually want to be following the characters, so everything in the shot should support that purpose.

    So if your intention is to paint a melieu where you're showing hustle bustle in a busy intersection, you may want to think long and hard on how you would go about it. Or you would project the photograph, trace it exactly and then render it exactly, like the photo realists. But if that's all fun for you, by all means, have fun and find out the different things you can play with, and what you have to keep as a rule to make those kinds of pics work.

    My example is done by sampling your colors and re-lining things merely for the purposes of illustrating my point. It may have no relevance to the actual place you are painting. So please take this in that spirit -- for talking a little about some general principles. Nothing has been finessed. This was not done to make the pic prettier.

    Thanks for being open to having me run roughshod over your really cool process. I hope this helps. Hope this isn't too much info.
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    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  6. #26
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    Oct 2007
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    Thanks for sharing your expertise, It is very welcomed and valued. I see your point on the telephone pole. and the shadow on the left side of the station. I think will remove the pole, lighten the sidewalk /parking area to the right and add the shadow to the left.
    My goal is not photorealism, but I do want some degree of realism. what I want mostly is to remember and record things seen and experienced. And I want to become at least a decent artist. so help and advice is very welcomed.
    Last edited by Jim Walsh; 07-04-2008 at 02:42 PM. Reason: added comments

  7. #27
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    Next update
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Name:	seacane 12.JPG 
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ID:	17824  

  8. #28
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    Oct 2007
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    getting close too finished project Trying to dicide if I should repaint the telephone pole on the right side or call it done.
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Name:	seacane 13.JPG 
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Size:	211.3 KB 
ID:	17859  

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
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    23,955
    Could do it on a layer. If you've got the time, give it your best shot and then it's a matter of toggling it on and off to see if you like it. That's almost even better than 'undo'.

    Go Jimbo!
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  10. #30
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    Oct 2007
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    Pennsylvania, USA
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    I've decided this one is finished. So I'll move the final pic to the other gallery. Thanks for all your tips and encouragement,

    as a final bonus here is a recent photo of me, Betsy Ross and Ben Franklin!

    Happy Independence Day +2
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