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danny72
08-13-2018, 06:45 AM
95748 Swedish former Nhl player(Dallas).. ,now the coach of Brynäs if .. My favorite team95749 one of the reference pictures

D Akey
08-13-2018, 11:49 PM
That's a really good caricature. You did some great work on all the hair all over his head from the beard to his fine wisps up top. Great structure. Looks just like him. Well done.

danny72
08-14-2018, 12:41 AM
Thanks.. This man saved my team from disaster last year. Keep the team in the highest league here in Sweden. Great coach.. Disaster sound a bit hard,but I don't know the name in english, when a team go down a level. Tacks for your comment. :-)

D Akey
08-14-2018, 04:36 AM
Thanks.. This man saved my team from disaster last year. Keep the team in the highest league here in Sweden. Great coach.. Disaster sound a bit hard,but I don't know the name in english, when a team go down a level. Tacks for your comment. :-)

"Disaster" and other hot words, both good and bad, are commonly used by sports fans and commentators. It fires up the whole experience. And in English the word has a wide range of degrees. We're not so precise with language especially when it comes to casual use. It's quite normal to inflate something and the listener has to kind of adjust their ear to the context of the conversation to know. So you can use "disaster" in any number of situations. It could mean anything from a house being messy to a spill in the kitchen and so forth all the way to a real tragedy like an explosion, a crash and so forth.

You think that's vague, wait till you hear about how our English curse words have a full range of meanings.

danny72
08-14-2018, 06:05 AM
The word that I wanted to write was "Relagation" ��

D Akey
08-14-2018, 06:23 AM
"Relegation" is a very uncommon word so far as I know. The word "Disaster" has an emotional charge on it that implies having a favorite team. Impartial judges would not be allowed to use it formally. So perhaps they would use "relegation". I've not heard it used in the sports I've paid attention to, but since I haven't followed sports a lot in many years it could have come into use. Or perhaps it's something they use in the UK. I'm from Los Angeles where every bit of ice here needs to be manufactured, so you're not going to see a lot of hockey among kids on the street.

danny72
08-14-2018, 06:43 AM
They use it in the premier league in the UK.(soccer,or like they say in England"football " When a team loses there place in the highest league. And move to a lower league. There are some difference between US English and UK English. (Like "back horse riding,calls in England just hors riding) There was a english comedian who told that to some American TV host ;-)