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worldInShades
07-13-2016, 07:25 PM
Hello there everyone. ;)

I've just discovered Art Rage, and how I wish I've found about it earlier.
Started doing some painting studies with Art Rage. I've been having lots of fun.
Haven't had a chance to explore the app in detail yet but I really love it so far. :D
Just learning to paint again after a decade of hiatus... Life just got so busy.

Anyways, please feel free to crit any of the work. :)

Used the grid tool with a reference image, very convenient!
Painted from photo reference. 1.5 hours.
90227

Reference image:
90228

Caesar
07-13-2016, 08:55 PM
A most promising start in this excercise.
Welcome!!!

pat1940
07-14-2016, 02:21 AM
This is a very good piece, so well done, welcome and hope to see many more

worldInShades
07-14-2016, 07:27 PM
Thanks guys!
There's a lot of awesome stuff in the forums. I could spend hours going through it all.


This one was pretty tough. Struggled a lot with the values and the subject.
Still a bit flat and I kind of gave up. Ambient lighting is really hard to work out.
Used a grid again, it really makes things too easy. I shouldn't rely on this so much, I can see this becoming a bad habit.
I couldn't really figure out how to add in speckles. No setting was imitating light dry brush dabbing you would with a real brush.

2 hours from photo reference.
90238

Reference photo:
90237

gxhpainter2
07-15-2016, 04:16 AM
some very nice work here! Painting with artrage or any digital software that emulates traditional media sometimes requires a new workflow and thought process to translate what you would do
with traditional media into how to get that look in artrage. for example to the a stipple look please investigate using the Sticker spray tool and the Art Brushes group, in there you will find some amazing tools. by spraying some Airbrush Spats on a new layer above your main drawing you can add the stipple and erase away any stray dots, and adjust the blend mode to multiply or some other and the opacity of that layer. Just some ideas for you to explore.. :):):)

DarkOwnt
07-15-2016, 04:38 AM
Although it doesn't mimic a dry brush completely, you could try this, and tweak as needed, it is very faint:

D Akey
07-16-2016, 06:33 AM
Haha. Very good exploration of textures and surfaces. All depends on what's important to you as the artist -- what your style is going to be. That will determine how successful these are. Right now, the frog looks good.

If you're rendering the glass vase, which is a really cool but an infinitely challenging model, overall it could do with a little more contrast.

The thing about that kind of surface is that as a model, there is no form or visual sensibility you can work from one end to the other unifying the whole thing. It's like trying to do a jigsaw puzzle of a Jackson Pollock painting. It all kind of looks random thus making it hard to grab in a full way and the painter can only go a daub at a time and hope that by the time you get to the other end of the bottle it has a similar feel.

However, if you're not going for realism, it's not a problem. Just choosing that kind of subject infers you're after realism. So that's what I'm talking about. Challenging subjects are super cool if one nails it. Then the "wow factor" works. And this photo was all about the glass and contrasting lighting giving it an organic shaped, translucent faceted patina. So how's the view up there atop Mt Olympus? Quite a climb.

:cool::cool::cool::cool::cool::):):):):):cool::coo l::cool::cool::cool:

Marilyn Anne
07-16-2016, 09:55 AM
You started out with some challenging objects and did a good job!

worldInShades
07-16-2016, 07:32 PM
some very nice work here! Painting with artrage or any digital software that emulates traditional media sometimes requires a new workflow and thought process to translate what you would do
with traditional media into how to get that look in artrage. for example to the a stipple look please investigate using the Sticker spray tool and the Art Brushes group, in there you will find some amazing tools. by spraying some Airbrush Spats on a new layer above your main drawing you can add the stipple and erase away any stray dots, and adjust the blend mode to multiply or some other and the opacity of that layer. Just some ideas for you to explore.. :):):)


Although it doesn't mimic a dry brush completely, you could try this, and tweak as needed, it is very faint:

Thank you so much for your suggestions gxhpainter and DarkOwnt! :D
I've tried a few ways, I think I still have much to explore but think I'm getting something that I can work with. I've sized up the brush to like 200~300% and using a mouse stamped(single clicked) around the areas on a new layer. Then erasing the areas I don't want. Still much to learn but think I'll get there eventually. Thank you again! :)

90246

worldInShades
07-16-2016, 07:36 PM
Haha. Very good exploration of textures and surfaces. All depends on what's important to you as the artist -- what your style is going to be. That will determine how successful these are. Right now, the frog looks good.

If you're rendering the glass vase, which is a really cool but an infinitely challenging model, overall it could do with a little more contrast.

The thing about that kind of surface is that as a model, there is no form or visual sensibility you can work from one end to the other unifying the whole thing. It's like trying to do a jigsaw puzzle of a Jackson Pollock painting. It all kind of looks random thus making it hard to grab in a full way and the painter can only go a daub at a time and hope that by the time you get to the other end of the bottle it has a similar feel.

However, if you're not going for realism, it's not a problem. Just choosing that kind of subject infers you're after realism. So that's what I'm talking about. Challenging subjects are super cool if one nails it. Then the "wow factor" works. And this photo was all about the glass and contrasting lighting giving it an organic shaped, translucent faceted patina. So how's the view up there atop Mt Olympus? Quite a climb.

:cool::cool::cool::cool::cool::):):):):):cool::coo l::cool::cool::cool:


Thank you very much for your inputs!! I can see it now, yes, it definitely could use more contrast. I totally get your points. And it will be one hard and rough of a climb. But I'll try to enjoy every moment of it this time around. Cheers! :)



You started out with some challenging objects and did a good job!

Thank you Marilyn! Much appreciated. :)

eighty+
07-16-2016, 09:04 PM
Hi Shades of Wonder I just love the bott and frog and I bow to your knowledge ok

I was wondering in the bott if U could have pushed the glass around with Knife to give it

twisted look ok But don't take any notice of me I'm just a Dab uh do yuh :D:D:D

CIAO IVAYE CON DIOS SLAINTE and as POZDRAWSKI would say Go GO GO lets see More

worldInShades
07-17-2016, 08:34 PM
Haha. Very good exploration of textures and surfaces. All depends on what's important to you as the artist -- what your style is going to be. That will determine how successful these are. Right now, the frog looks good.

If you're rendering the glass vase, which is a really cool but an infinitely challenging model, overall it could do with a little more contrast.

The thing about that kind of surface is that as a model, there is no form or visual sensibility you can work from one end to the other unifying the whole thing. It's like trying to do a jigsaw puzzle of a Jackson Pollock painting. It all kind of looks random thus making it hard to grab in a full way and the painter can only go a daub at a time and hope that by the time you get to the other end of the bottle it has a similar feel.

However, if you're not going for realism, it's not a problem. Just choosing that kind of subject infers you're after realism. So that's what I'm talking about. Challenging subjects are super cool if one nails it. Then the "wow factor" works. And this photo was all about the glass and contrasting lighting giving it an organic shaped, translucent faceted patina. So how's the view up there atop Mt Olympus? Quite a climb.

:cool::cool::cool::cool::cool::):):):):):cool::coo l::cool::cool::cool:


Hi Shades of Wonder I just love the bott and frog and I bow to your knowledge ok

I was wondering in the bott if U could have pushed the glass around with Knife to give it

twisted look ok But don't take any notice of me I'm just a Dab uh do yuh :D:D:D

CIAO IVAYE CON DIOS SLAINTE and as POZDRAWSKI would say Go GO GO lets see More


D Akey and eight+, really appreciate your insights.
I went back and fixed up all the things that were bothering me.
The relationship of the values, structure/form, quality of the edges(blurred the background where it didn't need crisp lines - thanks palate knife), and adding in more detail where its needed. I think it really helped to isolate the subject matter from the image. And getting the glass feel like more glass overall.

90252

Here's the original for difference:
90253

And the original:
90254

Caesar
07-18-2016, 06:49 PM
A leapfrog of Your Artrage mastery :oLOL ..... not really, You started already as a very talented and expert artist, so, as soon as You feel confident and at ease with ArtRage, we'll see Your art fireworks!

D Akey
07-19-2016, 10:38 AM
Oh, that second version (which is the first in this post of the 3 pics) is so much more true to that kind of irregular glass experience. Fantastic improvement to the result with a bit more care as you have shown. Really first rate. Bravo!

:cool::cool::cool::cool::cool::):):):):):cool::coo l::cool::cool::cool:

worldInShades
07-20-2016, 07:37 AM
A leapfrog of Your Artrage mastery :oLOL ..... not really, You started already as a very talented and expert artist, so, as soon as You feel confident and at ease with ArtRage, we'll see Your art fireworks!


Oh, that second version (which is the first in this post of the 3 pics) is so much more true to that kind of irregular glass experience. Fantastic improvement to the result with a bit more care as you have shown. Really first rate. Bravo!

:cool::cool::cool::cool::cool::):):):):):cool::coo l::cool::cool::cool:

Thank you Casesar and D Akey. Learning lots almost every day. Do really like Art Rage so far. And the bottle paint needed lot more fine tuning.

And the latest study. Trying to learn the program better. Picked a relatively simpler subject
this time. Learning to utilize the thinner in the brush settings and air brush. Think I need to explore the sticker spray next time.
About 2 hours and a bit.
90267

Photo reference:
90268

D Akey
07-21-2016, 06:55 AM
Looks great. I wonder if people know whether you have added a new painting, which would account for the lack of comments.

Nice citrus. I definitely like the brighter saturation. Now, if you're an optimist, you have to paint some lemonade.

And yes, regarding the glass bottle or most any other painting, one can always go in and tighten things or make changes. It's one of the more neurotic aspects to being an artist. We change and see new stuff in our work all the time and might choose to "correct" it.

I saw a little clip from the movie about the painter Turner. Apparently they allowed the artists back then to come into the salons and continue making changes on their own paintings while they were on display. Imagine. Just smell the turpentine! So it's a bit of a challenge to learn to call something "done" and move forward to the next painting and then the next.

I could go either way on it myself. You could change it, add detail and so forth if you're learning. Could always put in the lettering and so forth or if your want to make a portfolio piece or something. But like with this painting of the lemon, it looks like you're already on your way to new subjects with new challenges.

Enjoy!

:cool::cool::cool::cool::cool::):):):):):cool::coo l::cool::cool::cool:

Caesar
07-21-2016, 08:28 PM
You capture subjects masterfully! This lemon is its essence indeed!
Maybe it would be fun to make anothe version a little more impressionistic by using also an appropriate gamut (from the color wheel) in order to use complementary colors to make it vibrate and further enhance the chroma of the most intense colors (the yellow here). CÚzanne docet (i.e. teaches, from Latin).