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gxhpainter2
05-05-2015, 06:57 AM
trying to expand my vocabulary of abstracts by reducing the amount of total activity and allowing the remaining marks more power and expressiveness ( I hope )... hope you enjoy this one. although a bit dark it was inspired by recent TV coverage of a volcano erupting under the ocean about 250 miles off the coast of Oregon ..:cool::cool::):)

D Akey
05-05-2015, 05:20 PM
The dragon stirs. . . I love stories of the olden days of the Tectonic Knights. . .

Very animated looking. I think perhaps these are looking cartoonish to me because they are so simplified that they could be animated with great ease. I can see this one in a movie illustrating and anthropomorphizing for kids the idea of molten rock under pressure with the plates spanning the planet.

Mr Vulcan's got a bone to pick with the petroleum set. . .

:eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::cool::cool::cool::cool:: cool::mad::mad::mad::mad::mad::p:p:p:p:p

Caesar
05-05-2015, 06:29 PM
You're not less volcanic than that volcano indeed! It's amazing how You can concretely describe anything, feelings included, with Your masterful abstracts. Here your magmatic creativity shines again!

DarkOwnt
05-05-2015, 11:44 PM
trying to expand my vocabulary of abstracts by reducing the amount of total activity and allowing the remaining marks more power and expressiveness ( I hope )... hope you enjoy this one. although a bit dark it was inspired by recent TV coverage of a volcano erupting under the ocean about 250 miles off the coast of Oregon ..:cool::cool::):)

Very nice! How did you achieve the irregular and organic impasto effect?

gxhpainter2
05-06-2015, 05:59 AM
The dragon stirs. . . I love stories of the olden days of the Tectonic Knights. . .

Very animated looking. I think perhaps these are looking cartoonish to me because they are so simplified that they could be animated with great ease. I can see this one in a movie illustrating and anthropomorphizing for kids the idea of molten rock under pressure with the plates spanning the planet.

Mr Vulcan's got a bone to pick with the petroleum set. . .

:eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::cool::cool::cool::cool:: cool::mad::mad::mad::mad::mad::p:p:p:p:p careful of this dragon dear D Akey he has a scorching breath!...


You're not less volcanic than that volcano indeed! It's amazing how You can concretely describe anything, feelings included, with Your masterful abstracts. Here your magmatic creativity shines again! thanks dear Caesar, and thanks for your comment I had not thought of it but over these past few years I seem to have settled into a kind of descriptive abstraction as you note..! that might not be a bad thing after all :cool::cool::):):)


Very nice! How did you achieve the irregular and organic impasto effect? thank you DarkOwnt, first let me say I use Photoshop CC and Art Rage in a workflow where I got back and forth between them during the creation of any piece. But that is because I first started with Photoshop and came to Art Rage. Using techniques recently posted by SomeOneSane you could also achieve the same result. But in this piece I first added a layer over the dark layer with a very rough layer texture and use chalk to build up reds, yellows, pinks in a kind of flattened S curve. then exported the image to Photoshop and added a layer style with bevel & emboss to it and changing the highlight color to pink and the shadow to dark blue. Then back to AR and I changed the blending mode for the layer to multiply and used the eraser to shape the mark into its final condition leaving the rough organic top part. Then after other changes to the image , exported it again to Photoshop and used the dodge/burn tool to highlight the top part and the burn tool to darken the lower edge and ends. I frequently use dodge/burn to add subtle adjustments to a work so lights and darks are more effective and organized.

Delofasht
05-06-2015, 07:08 AM
The dodge/burn tool of Photoshop is very much akin to using the Airbrush in ArtRage set to linear burn (burn tool in photoshop) and linear dodge (dodge tool in photoshop) as the way it's affecting the pixels follows a similar if not exact same algorithm. It might save you needing to hop back and forth quite as often. Also the emboss effect might be achieved faster by using duplicates of certain layers or selections (copy paste the selection to put it on a separate layer), then setting the bump blend mode to Add to push the depth of the areas faster. It took me a bit of time and experimenting to get the Impasto effects I liked. There are other ways to increase the thickness of paint in a given area as well, using the same technique for making selections or duplication of the layer and locking the transparent pixels of that layer then using a Thick Oil paint to brush on heavier thicker paint into the area (setting to bump mode: add will further pick up the texture of the strokes below as well).

Since experimenting so heavily with ArtRage recently I've come to find I don't ever need to go into Photoshop for anything outside of checking for out of CMYK color gamut for print reproduction. (If I'd known more about color gamuts 2 years ago my current prints would look much better)

gxhpainter2
05-06-2015, 08:43 AM
The dodge/burn tool of Photoshop is very much akin to using the Airbrush in ArtRage set to linear burn (burn tool in photoshop) and linear dodge (dodge tool in photoshop) as the way it's affecting the pixels follows a similar if not exact same algorithm. It might save you needing to hop back and forth quite as often. Also the emboss effect might be achieved faster by using duplicates of certain layers or selections (copy paste the selection to put it on a separate layer), then setting the bump blend mode to Add to push the depth of the areas faster. It took me a bit of time and experimenting to get the Impasto effects I liked. There are other ways to increase the thickness of paint in a given area as well, using the same technique for making selections or duplication of the layer and locking the transparent pixels of that layer then using a Thick Oil paint to brush on heavier thicker paint into the area (setting to bump mode: add will further pick up the texture of the strokes below as well).

Since experimenting so heavily with ArtRage recently I've come to find I don't ever need to go into Photoshop for anything outside of checking for out of CMYK color gamut for print reproduction. (If I'd known more about color gamuts 2 years ago my current prints would look much better) Thanks Delofasht for the AR tips, as I said I am pretty sure you can do most things in AR if you know the right tricks... so thanks for sharing I am sure everyone will appreciate it as I do ! :):):):cool::cool:

DarkOwnt
05-06-2015, 11:36 AM
The dodge/burn tool of Photoshop is very much akin to using the Airbrush in ArtRage set to linear burn (burn tool in photoshop) and linear dodge (dodge tool in photoshop) as the way it's affecting the pixels follows a similar if not exact same algorithm. It might save you needing to hop back and forth quite as often. Also the emboss effect might be achieved faster by using duplicates of certain layers or selections (copy paste the selection to put it on a separate layer), then setting the bump blend mode to Add to push the depth of the areas faster. It took me a bit of time and experimenting to get the Impasto effects I liked. There are other ways to increase the thickness of paint in a given area as well, using the same technique for making selections or duplication of the layer and locking the transparent pixels of that layer then using a Thick Oil paint to brush on heavier thicker paint into the area (setting to bump mode: add will further pick up the texture of the strokes below as well).

Since experimenting so heavily with ArtRage recently I've come to find I don't ever need to go into Photoshop for anything outside of checking for out of CMYK color gamut for print reproduction. (If I'd known more about color gamuts 2 years ago my current prints would look much better)

Delo:

Perhaps a good challenge would be for you to create the effect entirely in ArtRage?

I'm sure you would find such a challenge interesting!