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Delofasht
04-15-2015, 06:46 AM
Needed a break from studying the script on my broken file for the painting of my cat that I've been working on, did this as a future work that I may or may not actually do (depending on how swamped with business I become and whether I end up improving faster than I can come back and finish this which happens from time to time).

86206

- Delo

cartuneman
04-15-2015, 11:55 AM
OMG I can see this as a premier painting....lay in some high contrast and lighting this looks so cool! just touch it with some definition just here and there and it will explode my friend!

Caesar
04-15-2015, 08:14 PM
Well everything's in place and the perspective really effective to take us unconventionally into the scene. This may become a really excellent finished place, but it's already quite evocative!

gxhpainter2
04-16-2015, 04:15 AM
you have sparked our imagination and as Caesar and Cartuneman say it is poised to explode with just a few details and contrast tonal work...

Delofasht
04-16-2015, 04:59 PM
Thanks everyone, I had done a few other thumbnails of this kind of scene but none felt near as natural as this one. Then I tried to do some sketches for something else I'm working on and got nowhere with that, couldn't seem to get this thing out of my mind. Looks like I will have to take it further I guess! Pretty sure the painting has me under it's control and I am just filling in colors to make it happy. :p Perfectly fine with me though, it's super fun, but I won't have much time to work on it until after this local arts and crafts faire in my town this weekend. Every 3rd Friday they run the arts/crafts thing and the foot traffic is amazing, going to see if some people want to buy my prints. Hoping I can sell at least 5 or 10 of them, but can never tell. . . maybe someone will commission me for something though, that'd be a welcome change from the work I had been doing as of late.

jacktar51
04-16-2015, 08:31 PM
Delo... I had to come in and agree with the members, this one has great potential, the perspective is there, the idea is there, its different because of the angle, and I like the colour pallet you have chosen, you don't need to change much at all for a really excellent painting, don't mess up this original though, and ALWAYS use a duplicate layer to work on, then you can revert if you need to, this really has a lot of promise Delo, and I would love to see you progress this one......Jack.

D Akey
04-17-2015, 03:27 PM
I really like the colors, and the composition looks like it's got a lot of merit. The thing is, for me, when doing a rough comp like this, it's a great opportunity to quickly establish your values. So for me everything that you have here is rather patchy without it really showing how the values are going to relate to each other in the composition.

I mean I really like the colors a lot. It's just that the same colors are peppered throughout the whole picture for the most part. And without more structure, it doesn't work as well as it might wear speed would explain what is where. So like cartoon man said, it could be a really good start. But it needs some more definitive parts to show lighting, to show planes, to show shapes to a large extent, and to then spice it up with some key details. Defining shapes and how they relate to each other is part of the pizzazz.

I think that would really help give focus to what it is you're doing with the painting. All of these marks could be really good as a ground that unites the whole picture later as you push and pull and shape the scene with more attention to what you're giving us, in other words the reason that you're doing this painting.

If you're using a scene of a harbor from the 1700s in dim light, sort of as a celebration of those tones, somewhat in the direction of James McNeill Whistler are one of those tonal, symphonic mood pieces which are often a dance of massive areas of color articulated here and there, then I think the marks that you make shouldn't be quite so hard-edged. And you can save the hard-edged for the areas of focus that will pull the eye and catch people's attention where you're saying this is the spot I want you to look at more than anything else in this impressionistic melieu.

Of course, I may be completely missing what you're trying to do. In which case, just carry-on and I look forward to seeing where you're going to take this. It does have a heck of a lot of potential. And the suggested composition that I see taking shape is not too shabby and should be very dramatic.

Go man go! :cool::cool::cool::cool::cool::):):):):):cool::coo l::cool::cool::cool::cool:

Delofasht
04-17-2015, 04:35 PM
Thanks for the thoughts D Akey! I actually start out all my work fairly washed out, I do this for a few reasons though, each pass I do on a painting increases saturation, value, and lighting, by keeping it muted in all 3 at the start I have a large range of options as I move forward that are easier to paint over without getting attached to anything, because changing something that looks bad is easy. Many of the marks in the background represent buildings or walkways, ropes, crates, and other things that might be found in that kind of scene. At this point in my painting, I am considering 3 things in this stage of my painting, composition, design, and color harmony. These things because they are the areas I feel are the hardest to adjust or create later in a painting (just me, other people seem to do it easily but I seem to struggle with it if I don't establish it early). As to the focus of the painting, I didn't have one yet so keeping it at such a rough stage lets me determine that as I move forward through my process. In the next step I will be working up the values a bit more though, and start working out relationships of space while considering the play of light and shadow. I've begun to realize my approach to my paintings is a bit more than different than most, it's like a series of suggestions that I constantly ask myself questions as I move through it, but each pass I make has certain answers for certain problems that vary per painting due to different questions presented at each time. Primarily though, I start with the above mentioned things, then build forms, then texture them, then highlighting and reflected lights (which I consider as well during each step), lastly I do a bit of atmosphere (unless I need it earlier). I suspect the focal points will be shoreline and it's series of buildings, structures, and the pier itself, as such I will be working to keep other areas more muted.

In retrospect this thread should have been in the work in progress subforum, but I wasn't really convinced I would take it further at the time. I have a local arts and crafts faire I'm going to this Friday so I won't get a chance to work on this until after that is done, been extremely busy ensuring I have prints to sell and a table, chairs, and now I have to pick up a tent because I hear they are calling for rain in the evening. Saturday though, oh I can't wait to jump back into this, my wife glanced at it and told me I had to finish it too.

D Akey
04-17-2015, 05:10 PM
Awesome. Hope it doesn't rain too hard. Send some of it our way. In California we're in a pretty severe drought and from the meager snowfall it's going to get worse.

It'll be fun to watch your process when you get back to it. Listen to your wife. She knows what she's talking about. Such enthusiasm like that. . . lucky fellow. You've got yourself a bona fide Muse.

Delofasht
04-27-2015, 07:50 PM
Not quite through with my second pass on this, where I'm really trying to build up the various buildings and major forms so I can actually reinforce the darks and lights in certain areas, a few of the darks in the harbor town seem a bit too dark and are flattening the foreground into the midground currently but I've got my eyes on it and will be working that out as I go. I'm also keeping my eyes on the lines of various catwalks and other bridges and such in the air as they seem to make some near tangents that are slightly distracting to me. My red roofed buildings will be leading us in to the scene. Compositionally everything feels okay to me for the most part but very angular right now and I'm going to need to add looping ropes and such to give me some curves in this as it's almost too angular right now. The boats in the harbor are going to provide me a bit of scale but I need something between my nearest boat and the miground elements to create some distance. . . maybe a buoy, maybe a floating crate. . . . maybe a ninja. I'll figure it out. Wanted to share the update as it's pretty significant, especially since I'm actually working at over double the resolution of the original (though I scale it down for posting here).

86331

As I get to more opaque paint layers the darks will end up darker, but right now much of the lighter base colors from the first pass are still showing through, but I'm starting to really get the feel for where everything is at, going to start looking at some reference for what else might be in a harbor that I might be able to add in the left side of the painting.

vandra
04-27-2015, 07:56 PM
It really is an exciting painting. There seems to be something brewing here :)

D Akey
04-27-2015, 08:00 PM
Fascinating process. I had seen other things in this one than what's been manifesting. Loving yours! Very much fantasy oriented and very full of whimsical other worldly with the stacking of the dwellings. Feels like something I would expect to see in a video game with all the visible choices of places to go. We having fun or what??!!??!!!!!

Go man go!!!!!!

:cool::cool::cool::cool::cool::):):):):):cool::coo l::cool::cool::cool:

gxhpainter2
04-28-2015, 04:59 AM
wow Delofasht this is really taking off !... it is exciting to see it at various stages, very creative and well painted ....

Delofasht
04-28-2015, 09:45 AM
Thanks for the encouragement everyone! I like having a general idea of what I want in mind after painting in the general shape where things are going to be then just building it up from there, if I plan it too thoroughly it tends to look a bit lifeless for some reason. I actually based most the town around some of the memories from photos and actual harbors and just pushed it closer together while trying to think about how the supports for the buildings would be connected with ladders and little walkways up and down, makes it more believable (though I try to push it a bit far with the skywalks perhaps). I dream of doing this kind of work for game or movie industries, they share a lot of the same kind of shots often.

cartuneman
04-28-2015, 02:14 PM
Wow an absolute delite to view, as the pic opens up from the fog so to speak.
A ton of eye candy, be aware of your depth and the lighting especially. depth can always be achieved through lineal sets but if a depth is only precised by a line it can become lost among all the others. Bring it to life man bring it to life

jacktar51
04-28-2015, 07:59 PM
Delo,
Hello mate, good to see your progressing this painting, the houses rising steeply from the harbour reminds me of a fishing town called Brixham, in south Devon, England. If you want to you can Google it for some pictures, the houses rise steeply from the harbour as in your painting, looks like this could be a good one if you stick with it, I would watch out for the sizes of the buildings as you go further into the distance, and some ships, boats, cranes, people and some dockside would not come amiss if you want to put some more interest into your painting, very good work so far, hope you keep progressing this........
Jack.

Delofasht
04-29-2015, 02:36 AM
Thanks cartuneman for the tips, I will indeed try to keep it in mind as I move forward. I caught a cold over the past couple days and it's slowing down my time to work on this considerably. . . but I have found it the perfect time to look for references and do some reading on traditional media. Everything is connected I say, each thing I learn about color mixing or pigment reactivity in traditional media ends up helping me make more careful decisions regarding color choices.

Oh wow Jack, looking up those pictures will be a perfect addition to my references! Thanks so much, that's going to be hugely helpful as I move forward, I'd had some of a few other little costal cities, but this is an amazing trove of good images from which to draw information. It never ceases to amaze me how fiction seems so based on reality, everything we read or imagine is based on what we have seen that is similar, and yet it's different in some ways too. Now I just need to get to feeling better so I can get back to work!

Delofasht
04-29-2015, 06:04 PM
Alright, so I've hit the end of the second pass and can now see where I'm going with my lighting pretty much. I keep it very subtle still because of the way I have my brushes set for digital painting (traditionally I use a very similar approach though). I have made my notes about what my color palette is telling me to do, in this case push the blue/purple shadows and make some nice cast shadows from many of the buildings onto other buildings, and pair it with a nice almost amber glow from the sun. (they must have some crazy pollution in this part of the world. . . maybe volcanic ash in the sky or something of the like, sulfur vents from the island they are on?) With all this in mind and the buildings pretty much mapped out I will be increasing the resolution for the next stage by 200% (I'm currently at like 2.5k pixels by like 1300 or so), I will also increase the ppi considerably for the rest of the painting as I won't need to worry about using big brushes anymore and I will want to tighten everything up and be able to blend things out well. This makes the file rather large and save times start to be a factor but given that I paint slowly and methodically this shouldn't be an issue as save time is just more time to think about my next few strokes.

86357

Next pass is all about texture, color variety, and pushing my lighting a bit further. Generally not the most time consuming pass though, so hopefully have an update soon!

jacktar51
04-29-2015, 07:23 PM
Its coming along nicely Delo, take your time, no rush, great results so far......Jack

D Akey
04-30-2015, 06:31 AM
Very cool. No idea which phase of the painting you're in, since I'm not familiar with this working method although I know it's popular among some digital artists because you never have to worry about the paint getting too thick to work on top of and drying time and all those old school concerns.

When I was painting, and this may have some worth to you, is that I set up the dark and light pattern within the picture first. That way you know you have a general blueprint that you know works and will work by the time you get to the finish.

So my comment is that possibly because you were meandering around the picture looking for the elements to present themselves to you, you lost the values in favor of bringing out the bits and bobs. It's all the same. Same colors, same values, same emphasis. I could see lots of places for you to divide up the village, for instance, based on using lighting to where you establish more spacial relationships -- bits in the shadows, cooler color, along with the light creating cast shadows, and some atmosphere and all around which you can introduce some colors in ways that make it snap more.

Also, in putting in colors as a base, you can work those colors in that area when you do the lights and darks, keeping them in the same family based on the place you're painting at that moment. It doesn't have to be outrageous or wild, can be subtle, but it will perhaps get you were you want to be faster and will give you more control if you have something in mind to create on canvas as opposed to a thing of discovery and exploiting what's manifesting as you paint. Some people like that. I had more success knowing where I was going and then going there was less meandering. Comes with having had deadlines.

Hope this makes sense. I would think it does because in past pictures you were using those sensibilities.

You're very exciting to watch and read. I'm loving all these paintings you're doing.

Go Man Go!!!!!!!!!!

:cool::cool::cool::cool::cool::):):):):):cool::coo l::cool::cool::cool:

pat1940
04-30-2015, 09:34 AM
Great work and wonderful advise from our friends in the forum, keep them coming

Delofasht
04-30-2015, 09:37 AM
Thanks for the comments D Akey! I honestly do not know if anyone else uses my approach or not, it shares similarities with a variety of different methods or approaches. Having learned traditionally I consider my passes in the same way I would do my paintings traditionally allowing for drying times, the benefit of working digitally is that I don't have to finish all of a pass in one sitting and am able to set it down at nearly any point without losing my place.

My particular passes are self developed and revolve around how I approach subject matter, I've also found I can pump out a painting from thumbnails and roughs in about 20 hours or so. I realize I stated I paint slowly, which is probably not the most accurate word, deliberately would be more appropriate. :) Three days of consecutive work hours do not come often for me right now, so I end up spanning my paintings over a few weeks instead and work on a few projects at a time to allow me some variety. Have an acrylic painting and an oil painting on my "easel" at the moment that I'm working up to make sure my skills are on point using the same approach. (those are going MUCH faster but are less involved than my digital painting) Also have a client piece I'm working on currently that is just a bit of composition and painting from photos, easy mode, that'll be done in a couple days easily (so like 2 weeks, a day a week :D)

Thanks for all the encouragement everyone!

byroncallas
05-02-2015, 04:45 PM
Terrific thread, watching how you develop this. I'm subscribing, hoping to see your next stages. Rewarding review.

Peter Pinckney
05-05-2015, 09:58 AM
I wasn't going to comment on this until it was finished BUT.............................It is so good,so far, that I cannot resist.........................BRILLIANT Mate!



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Caesar
05-05-2015, 06:35 PM
You're engaged quite successfully in a stunning task! Every step looks fantastic and balanced and You are really getting a marvel!

D Akey
05-05-2015, 08:54 PM
You've already possibly heard of the guy, Bierstadt. I think he has some key things going on that I was inferring in my previous comment about grouping the details into masses that make it easier to move around in as a viewer. I know his distances, scales and palettes are different than what you're doing. And I don't mean to copy this stuff. I just mean to use his paintings to illustrate that principle of how it tends to improve compositions and interest because you're then helping the viewer get the grand spectacle in a first read, second read, third read process. This way you can imply lots more detail than you need to include as well.

Hope this helps. When I finally learned that trick it really helped me more than I can tell you because it has applications in so many types of paintings. You can invent lighting that is logical and also invent colors that separate things into masses. Anyway, have fun!

Delofasht
05-06-2015, 04:31 AM
Awesome examples D Akey! I am a big fan of the artists of that era from the Hudson River School, amazingly gorgeous stunning landscapes. Indeed they are good illustrations of the concept, and they work quite well for conveyance of your points most eloquently so. I do consider my value structure early on in my process, just keeping it more neutral. I think why I am working this way might be helpful, and I hadn't considered trying to explain this before, basically I'm painting in the way that I see.

My perception tends to recognize shapes first, followed by the local color of objects, after that is proportions, then the value structure, and lastly the details. All these get processed very quickly, but are what I believe my brain processes and in what order. I used to think it was different, and indeed it may be, but for me this seems to be how my brain organizes information. This could be a very interesting study for oneself to do to find out how they process information, it really helped me figure out how to structure my painting approach to work best for my brain. I couldn't say it could work for everyone, but the idea is to learn your way of seeing and then apply your method such that it's conducive to the way you already work.

So when I'm painting, I'm approaching my subject matter in that way, and it feels totally natural to me. I will always be experimenting though and using different approaches, as by doing that I've learned what works for me.

Thanks everyone for all the encouragement, everyone in my household seems to be finally over their colds so I think I might actually be able to get back to work on this now!

Delofasht
05-06-2015, 09:28 PM
So it took a little over 3 hours more but I got everything I needed done in my 3rd pass and put a small extra step in my process by adding some glazing in of some extra light and shadow. To do that I use a 100% thinners Oil Brush and Palette knife set to Wet to simulate a glazing where the oil paint is spread out over the surface very thinly or applied and some of it is wiped back out with an eraser, this simulates my normal traditional method of oiling out the surface and glazing in my colors over an area making sure that the color is spread evenly and thinly suspended in the oiled surface. Directly after this oiling out process (I've heard it called oiling in, or creating a "couch" as well) I would start working into that same oil and very thin color with my 4th Pass, this is why in digital it's kind of an intermediate step. I added all the color variety I wanted everywhere for the most part and added all the lighting and shadow primarily, from here forward it's all highlights, reflected light and smoothing out textures and details. These next steps will basically make the painting work.

I should have noticed that the way the boat is setting in relation to the horizon was making the harbor look too small for this boat to dock at. There are several digital trick I could use to fix this but the distortion might be resolved by making the docked boat in the harbor slightly bigger, I'm going to be looking at enlarging the effect of foreshortening on the oar from the guy rowing to make it look much closer to us as well and perhaps add some more depth here. I considered something between the row boat and the harbor but I don't like that, I could perhaps make it a slightly larger boat by adding a sail to it (more like a large skiff at that point), the sail could even be of asian design where it's leaning much further back and the sail tied down so it doesn't disturb the view of the harbor, could be an interesting element that I will toy with.

Overall though it's ready for the last coat of paint, where I will add in tons of details on everything with a tiny brush at a really high resolution so I can get all the details and color mixing in that I want. It's time to make this thing look like a real painting. 4th pass will take several days, but when it's done this painting should be very solid. I have 3 aspects I will be focusing on in the 4th pass, edges, highlights/reflected lights, and details. This is where I use more careful on canvas blending with the palette of colors that I have already, traditionally I would be doing this after oiling out the lighting pass and work in those areas with all the details right on top of that so the color remains consistent while using the palette of colors I have already mixed up. Digitally I will be using the Palette Knife wet to carefully blend out and up to edges, which I will often use to indicate atmospheric effects like fog or steam or things like that.

Coming together now.

86444

byroncallas
05-07-2015, 04:56 AM
Wow. It just gets better and better. Wonderful work. Thanks so much for continuing to describe your process; it's very helpful.

Regarding increasing the resolution, what resolution have you been working with and what will you increase it to for the details?
Will you use the ArtRage resizing feature or a third party program?
Have you found it necessary to use a specialized resizing program when upsizing both the dpi and the canvas size more than, say, 200% or 300%.

I ask as I notice that sometimes when I upsize by large percentages increasing both the dpi and the canvas size together, I often get odd and undesirable effects, particularly if I want to retain layers during the upsizing. There are programs like BenVistas Photozoom that are supposed to address this, but are expensive, and of course only work on merged, exported files. Maybe they work with Photoshop files that have retained their layers (?). I sometimes want to make VERY large upsizes in the canvas size for printing final art while retaining a 300ppi (or dpi) printing resolution. Any thoughts or particular experience with very large upsizing.

Henry Stahle
05-07-2015, 05:30 AM
...Coming together now.

It is! I think it is a great piece of painting... good art. It is.

Delofasht
05-07-2015, 06:28 AM
I don't have a lot of feedback to give on increasing the resolution beyond 200% really, as I work from small 1600 pixel on the long side to start and as I move through each pass I increase the resolution by 150 to 200% (same for DPI until it gets to 300, starting at 100 or so). I generally know that I want my art to look good printed at roughly 2 feet on the long side, but I've only recently begun really focusing on that, as for monitors it's much easier to get a resolution that will look good.

Never really used any 3rd party software to do my resolution increases because I keep the size changes relatively small and because I've learned to understand how the software is creating the new pixel information. This makes everything pretty predictable and easy to fix for me, but also because I'm using that blurry fuzziness one can get as a feature. Took awhile to get to where I could make that feature not look too digital, which is my major issue with 3rd party software designed to increase resolution, it has an effect of leaving a really digital look to it. Just like we can look at a photo and identify a studio shot from a natural lighting shot, once you know what to look for it's hard not to see it.

For this painting I started at 1200 by 675 pixels I believe, and just went about working it up from there. In my 3rd Pass I was at 5400 by 3000 pixels, and I have decided to double it again for the results I want from this work, but for my normal printed work (which ends up being roughly 18 inches on the long side for printing purposes) this was fine. I decided to aim for a much higher resolution image this time than I would usually do only because I really want to get into some of these details, I'm really just enjoying this piece so much and I want to make sure my paint thickness is going to work out the way I want.

In the future I plan to try to use a script to paint as smaller sizes and playback at much higher resolutions instead of just using the resolution changes. I've read that it can really be a much cleaner solution to getting higher resolution images. I do wish I had a way to edit the script in a timeline style feature where I could delete undo/redo operations to compress the file down and make the script execute faster, I know I can do this with coding but it's time consuming work with less reward than energy cost for me right now. (reason I had to abandon my last script, it had a glitch in it and I couldn't find it, not for a lack of looking for it)

byroncallas
05-07-2015, 07:48 AM
I don't have a lot of feedback to give on increasing the resolution beyond 200% really, as I work from small 1600 pixel on the long side to start and as I move through each pass I increase the resolution by 150 to 200% (same for DPI until it gets to 300, starting at 100 or so). I generally know that I want my art to look good printed at roughly 2 feet on the long side, but I've only recently begun really focusing on that, as for monitors it's much easier to get a resolution that will look good.

Never really used any 3rd party software to do my resolution increases because I keep the size changes relatively small and because I've learned to understand how the software is creating the new pixel information. This makes everything pretty predictable and easy to fix for me, but also because I'm using that blurry fuzziness one can get as a feature. Took awhile to get to where I could make that feature not look too digital, which is my major issue with 3rd party software designed to increase resolution, it has an effect of leaving a really digital look to it. Just like we can look at a photo and identify a studio shot from a natural lighting shot, once you know what to look for it's hard not to see it.

For this painting I started at 1200 by 675 pixels I believe, and just went about working it up from there. In my 3rd Pass I was at 5400 by 3000 pixels, and I have decided to double it again for the results I want from this work, but for my normal printed work (which ends up being roughly 18 inches on the long side for printing purposes) this was fine. I decided to aim for a much higher resolution image this time than I would usually do only because I really want to get into some of these details, I'm really just enjoying this piece so much and I want to make sure my paint thickness is going to work out the way I want.

In the future I plan to try to use a script to paint as smaller sizes and playback at much higher resolutions instead of just using the resolution changes. I've read that it can really be a much cleaner solution to getting higher resolution images. I do wish I had a way to edit the script in a timeline style feature where I could delete undo/redo operations to compress the file down and make the script execute faster, I know I can do this with coding but it's time consuming work with less reward than energy cost for me right now. (reason I had to abandon my last script, it had a glitch in it and I couldn't find it, not for a lack of looking for it)

OK, much thanks for the feedback. Stating the re-sizing differently, for printing, I often blow up to 48 or more inches on the long side, printing at 300DPI. It strains the resizing software to get it right; little creatures sneak in. I usually use third-party alternatives on an exported PNG; the AR resizing at this level introduces way too many strange artifacts, and often collapses certain 3D lightings in layered paintings. Third party alternatives work "ok", particularly with my abstract art which is, let's say, somewhat forgiving. I'm not sure what the outcome would be on, for example, your painting here where certain nuance can be considerably more material in the final viewing than it might be in most of my efforts.

A note on scripts, or the AR ones assuming that's what you mean, my paintings have an enormous amount of digital information in them. Unfortunately, I've never had a single script spit one out faithfully. Divergence is often considerable. I think it is just one of those things where it will be a few years before the bugs can be worked out. I understand, and accept, there is enormous programing complexity to arrive at something close to perfection for this kind of reproduction duplication. My little investigations suggest the technology is of course there, but to expect it to be perfected in a commercial program costing under $50 is probably asking a bit much. It's especially a bit much since its only a side-show to the otherwise fantastic features that make AR a terrific painting program offered at an unbelievably low price. I love the idea of using the scripting feature in the way you describe; we share a like vision. But for complex work, it seems realistic it is something a little more out there in the future. The future comes quickly these days though, so maybe not all THAT far out. :-)

Thanks again for your input, it's quite helpful seeing how you approach your work.

Delofasht
05-07-2015, 09:43 AM
I would wonder at the cause of the artifacts in increasing the resolution, it sounds like it's included the lighting and texture in the process and is cause for more of your artifact issues. The canvas lighting can be turned off prior to exporting a PNG to get the texture and lighting to be better for enlargement, press f5 to turn off canvas lighting prior to export, that might assist with some of it.

I'm working on understanding the scripting language better and slowly working my way through it, beginning to understand more and more as the days progress. I hope to understand enough to make the next piece using scripts for enlargement rather than the rescaling features though, and will post the progress on that. Like you I foresee extreme potential in this particular aspect of the painting process for purposes of printing, some adjustments to canvas settings and their affects might need to be accounted for though. New frontiers, gotta do the research to make it work properly, and help them to code it.

Interesting to try to push the limits of the software. . . I suppose the biggest limitation is the layers at high resolutions though. Thanks, for the comments, I'm really glad to have interesting conversation regarding the potential of some of the aspects of this software and even it's limitations. Also really pleases me that my process might help others understand something in art they might not have noticed before, I'd always considered myself such a student, but now I feel like I've finally learned enough to start really sharing in earnest. That and I am not nearly as handicapped by my software as I have been in the past (for achieving the look I like).