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leela4
08-28-2014, 04:06 PM
I've been drawing and painting the traditional way pretty much all my life, but now want to learn digital painting. I got this software along with a Wacom Intuos Tablet and I have to say I'm amazed at how hard it is to draw on the tablet as well as I can on paper. I feel like I'm back in kindergarten. So, I'm wondering if this was everyone's experience when you were starting out with it? Any advice on getting better at it?

copespeak
08-28-2014, 04:46 PM
Welcome! Just work at it, practice certainly does improve your skills. :)

hildee
08-28-2014, 05:56 PM
It is a bit of a weird experience syncing your hands and eyes from tablet to screen but you get the hang of it after a while. All the best and best of all, have fun :D

markw
08-28-2014, 09:07 PM
Welcome to the AR forums leela4.
Yes it takes a little getting used to. But to be honest I think I might prefer using my tablet to paper now!
When everything is flowing, looking at the screen, I'm completely unaware of my hands. Lines and paint just seem to appear in front of me as I think of them. It's almost magical!

D Akey
08-29-2014, 01:02 AM
You got it! Like learning to ride a bicycle. Once you find the balancing point, you never worry again about staying upright. Have fun!

Bertrude
08-29-2014, 02:10 AM
My only advice to keep at it.

That said you don't get that same sort of tactile feedback from the tablet surface. I've 'slipped' god knows how many times when trying to draw stuff but you just get used to it and there's plenty of advantages to working digitally, like 'undoing' that slip :).

hildee
08-29-2014, 08:56 AM
Also, forgot to say that a pen tablet is very handy when your wrist gets sore from using the mouse. I switch from mouse to tablet when that happens, although I rarely get a sore wrist nowadays since I use both equally because you can browse icons and programs and internet with the pen - everything you can do with a mouse...and more.

Someonesane
08-29-2014, 01:12 PM
I suggest starting with the basics. By this, I mean you should do a lot of simple exercises, before trying to complete a major work of art, because it'll be easy to get discouraged when you're trying to achieve something digitally that you know you could pull off easily doing it traditionally. So just take time out of every day to do digital gesture drawings and quick paintings where you won't get down on yourself for not sticking the details. You'll slowly train your muscle memory in the process to the point where you won't even realize you're using a new tool and then you'll be good to go into more detailed work.

Gms9810
09-08-2014, 12:27 PM
You can find quite a bit of help on youtube too.

Liquid Len
09-18-2014, 08:21 AM
Make sure that your tablet is set up correctly so that you are getting the best from it. I had problems drawing with my Intuos3 until I realised it was set up for right-handed use - I am a 'leftie'! Even something as basic as that can make a profound difference to how you take to digital painting.

Get as much practice as you can and, above all, have fun! If you find yourself lacking in inspiration at any time, just come back and visit the gallery and peruse the forum, it will work wonders!

Gms9810
09-18-2014, 10:32 AM
And try every button and function you can find. Above all, never try to just jump in and try to draw a serious drawing. Just doodle a lot and learn what everythng can and can't do.

fstopdigital
09-19-2014, 02:36 AM
And try every button and function you can find. Above all, never try to just jump in and try to draw a serious drawing. Just doodle a lot and learn what everythng can and can't do.

I disagree. Doodling is great and you can learn a lot, but attempting a "serious" painting is the only way to figure out the software limitations, and your personal workflow. You will never have the same kind of understanding of a program until you have a strong goal in mind and a real project to test it with - even if it's only for personal use. I get my best eureka! moments in the middle of big projects, not just drawing pages of throwaway sketches. For example, knowing which things I need to bind to hotkeys.

Additionally - and here is a very important tip - BUY FELT NIBS FOR YOUR PENS. I cannot stress this enough. I find the wacom surface too smooth - the felt nibs give back a little texture and you'd be amazing how it changes up your lines and strokes.

I would say to ANYONE working with a digital tablet. Felt nibs are almost essential if you are coming from a physical media background.

Liquid Len
09-19-2014, 03:17 AM
I have found that the 'standard' white nibs work best if you tape a sheet of paper over the working area of the tablet. So long as the paper is no heavier than 100gsm, it does not affect the sensitivity. By varying the type of paper used, you can tweak the 'feel' of the pen on on the paper to give something approximating that of using traditional tools. It also serves to protect the surface of the tablet and can be replaced if it gets grubby or torn; a cheap, quick and easy fix! I use 100gsm copier paper and it has a satisfying tooth to it which feels pretty much like using a graphite pencil on paper.

fstopdigital
09-19-2014, 04:05 AM
I have found that the 'standard' white nibs work best if you tape a sheet of paper over the working area of the tablet. So long as the paper is no heavier than 100gsm, it does not affect the sensitivity. By varying the type of paper used, you can tweak the 'feel' of the pen on on the paper to give something approximating that of using traditional tools. It also serves to protect the surface of the tablet and can be replaced if it gets grubby or torn; a cheap, quick and easy fix! I use 100gsm copier paper and it has a satisfying tooth to it which feels pretty much like using a graphite pencil on paper.

That is a great idea... unless you have a Cintiq...:p

Gms9810
09-19-2014, 09:00 AM
Disagreeing is ok. It doesn't make one right or wrong. I just spoke from 40 years experience of working with computers. You may have more.

hildee
09-19-2014, 10:27 AM
if you tape a sheet of paper over the working area of the tablet. So long as the paper is no heavier than 100gsm, it does not affect the sensitivity.

I use 300gsm watercolour paper as well - works fine even at that thickness and doesn't need to be taped either, just hold. Although it doesn't have the brush feel of course when using eg watercolour brush - it is a "pen" tablet after all. Pen work is more realistic than brush when using paper.

Doodling is fun, a great way to learn when introduced to a program, trying out all sorts of stuff.

Gms9810
09-19-2014, 11:22 AM
I use a standard black nib and 20 pound paper, no special stuff has to be bought.

Gms9810
09-19-2014, 11:23 AM
To amend that. I have used Strathmore 90 pound too.