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gxhpainter2
05-19-2014, 07:10 AM
I was watching a BBC special on impressionists and loved the section on Seurat, this piece was inspired by the close ups they did of several of his works.. while it is not directly a pointillist work it owes a lot to his ideas...

stevemawmv
05-19-2014, 07:31 AM
Hi Gary...Though it may not be directly a pointillist work, by taking inspiration from Seurat. What is more important to me is from the inspiration, you have put your sense of imagery and style into this piece and in doing so made this a wonderful tribute to the man.
Take care dear friend,
Steve

MKROOT
05-19-2014, 08:29 AM
I like it :)

copespeak
05-19-2014, 09:36 AM
Seurat was brilliant with all those dots coalescing in to a vibrant light filled painting. The thought of him standing there going dot, dot, dot, dash, dash, dash makes my head spin.

Yours is so lively and colourful too Gary. Very nice! :cool:

Alexandra
05-19-2014, 04:26 PM
So alive, another brilliant work from you Gary. Love it.

pai
05-19-2014, 08:11 PM
So beautiful. It really see how that TV show has inspired you. Indeed, this painting gives me an impressionist feel. Really love how you come up with these beautiful color palette and it works perfectly in your design. Awesome piece. Another one of my favorite of yours :)

D Akey
05-20-2014, 02:31 AM
Kaboom! In your face, George Seurat! :D

Because of your palette, you remind me a little more of Paul Signac's painting, Grand Canal, Venice, 1905

I'm still blown away that Seurat only lived to age 31 yet made such an impact.

All that aside, it's a very easy painting to look at. I like the variety of marks in ways that almost give it a perspective as if an explosion is coming at us. It's a neat metaphor for an art movement exploding onto the scene, with the bits being like his dots all detaching as if separate.

justjean
05-20-2014, 02:44 AM
Great colours and shapes in that happy explosion, Gary :D

kenmo
05-20-2014, 02:49 AM
A fine tribute with a nice choice of colors....

gxhpainter2
05-20-2014, 04:02 AM
Hi Gary...Though it may not be directly a pointillist work, by taking inspiration from Seurat. What is more important to me is from the inspiration, you have put your sense of imagery and style into this piece and in doing so made this a wonderful tribute to the man.
Take care dear friend,
Stevethank you very much Steve, a great comment...:cool::cool:


I like it :)thank you MKROOT :)


Seurat was brilliant with all those dots coalescing in to a vibrant light filled painting. The thought of him standing there going dot, dot, dot, dash, dash, dash makes my head spin.

Yours is so lively and colourful too Gary. Very nice! :cool: Robyn , yes his particular style requires much for patience than I possess yet his ideas of color and how they act in relation to each other is still a point of great interest to me.



So alive, another brilliant work from you Gary. Love it. very sweet , thank you Sandy... hope you get your outdoor work done so we can see more painting from you !...:cool::rolleyes: :):)


So beautiful. It really see how that TV show has inspired you. Indeed, this painting gives me an impressionist feel. Really love how you come up with these beautiful color palette and it works perfectly in your design. Awesome piece. Another one of my favorite of yours :) thank you very much pai, that is a big compliment I am so pleased you enjoyed this.


Kaboom! In your face, George Seurat! :D

Because of your palette, you remind me a little more of Paul Signac's painting, Grand Canal, Venice, 1905

I'm still blown away that Seurat only lived to age 31 yet made such an impact.

All that aside, it's a very easy painting to look at. I like the variety of marks in ways that almost give it a perspective as if an explosion is coming at us. It's a neat metaphor for an art movement exploding onto the scene, with the bits being like his dots all detaching as if separate. D Akey I am impressed that you found that painting from Paul Signac!... how on earth did you find it? you are right his colors and mine and even the size and spacing of the dots and dashes are more similar. I am familiar with his work of course but think I will have to revisit his paintings now!..


Great colours and shapes in that happy explosion, Gary :D thank you justjean , it was a little different choice of colors for me but it came out well enough. :):)


A fine tribute with a nice choice of colors.... thanks kenmo I wanted to paint something that stretched my color choices a bit in a new direction but more high key and uplifting..:cool::cool:

silvy
05-20-2014, 05:21 AM
Love this painting:) good choice of vibrant colors. Great!

D Akey
05-20-2014, 06:34 AM
As to finding the painting by Signac, the Universe provides -- like a magnetic pull once an intention or even a topic is set.

I was looking up Seurat because your palette was rather different from how I remember Seurat and wanted to check my facts for accuracy before I spoke, and it's like I have this presence watching over my shoulder that says stuff like -- "Oh, you're wondering about that are ya? Well how about this?" And there it is, something even more on topic than I was. Heh.

Happens all the time and it's rather uncanny when you're open to those kinds of things.

gxhpainter2
05-20-2014, 07:14 AM
Love this painting:) good choice of vibrant colors. Great! thank you silvy


As to finding the painting by Signac, the Universe provides -- like a magnetic pull once an intention or even a topic is set.

I was looking up Seurat because your palette was rather different from how I remember Seurat and wanted to check my facts for accuracy before I spoke, and it's like I have this presence watching over my shoulder that says stuff like -- "Oh, you're wondering about that are ya? Well how about this?" And there it is, something even more on topic than I was. Heh.

Happens all the time and it's rather uncanny when you're open to those kinds of things. ok very cool, yes when you listen you will find all kinds of great things... I checked out Paul's images on google and was pleasantly reminded of his great work and interesting pallet. A very interesting short bio on Wikipedia as well. I just ordered a book of his watercolors done later in his career. As I have been in digial mode for a number of years but I still have all my watercolor tools, just need to get some fresh tubes of color. I still have quite a bit of paper stock too. I think I might have to venture back into that world... and maybe like our friend jibes pull an image of the natural watercolor into AR for further tweaking... so you have helped me make yet another course correction to a new destination in my art career !..:cool::cool:

Caesar
05-20-2014, 09:19 PM
Seurat and then Signac! You painted in pills and tablets like them and got a sight elixir! Very good.
Personally I find pointillism a little too rationalized as a painting style and I rather prefer, within the same basic idea, painters like Pissarro or of the Italian divisionismo.

Marilyn Anne
05-21-2014, 02:58 AM
Lovely colors and interesting to look at. Very modern look!

AndreaMG
05-21-2014, 07:51 AM
Wait I have a title on this one: "Candyfloss". Very nicely done as usual. Ciao

gxhpainter2
05-21-2014, 09:07 AM
Seurat and then Signac! You painted in pills and tablets like them and got a sight elixir! Very good.
Personally I find pointillism a little too rationalized as a painting style and I rather prefer, within the same basic idea, painters like Pissarro or of the Italian divisionismo.thanks Caesar, I checked out divisionismo and got the Italian Wikipedia...lol...not much help so I changed the spelling and found lots of good reference material... very interesting..it seems that branch had quite a few Italian artists practicing it.


Lovely colors and interesting to look at. Very modern look! thank you Marilyn Anne


Wait I have a title on this one: "Candyfloss". Very nicely done as usual. Ciao Candyfloss works for me!....since there is no apparent subject or even geometry to this, still thinking about that turn of events...I like of left it an amorphous bright shape... like DAkey says an explosion...

Caesar
05-21-2014, 08:33 PM
Herebelow ther are a coupe of sites.
The first one in english talk of them. However, somehow differently from what it says, the Italian divisionism cdid orresponds to the pointillism, but the painters here neither applied "scientifically" the color theory of French, just a too rational and mechanical approach for them, nor they used dots or equal short linear traits rigidly similar, because in Italy there wasn't only an influence of impressionism from Paris (used by Italian master in Paris, but with a far weaker influence at home), but also other local new artistic movements and traditions (macchiaioli, scapigliatura, decadentismo).
Therefore divisionist painters could better reflect, in my view, all light vibrations and still keep a painting quite lyrical and realistic with free filament-like brushstrokes. They also created the style conditions to the follow-on Futurismo, the painting of progress, modernity, machines, speed and dynamics unfortunately too little know internationally because of the coincidence with the fascist period (although it influenced much Russian and other art styles at their times, like the Constructivism )....
You may look at Segantini, Pellizza da Volpedo and other by googling their name and images.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Divisionism
https://www.google.it/search?q=divisionismo&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=9lB8U8v1Fomv7AaEkYGwBg&sqi=2&ved=0CAYQ_AUoAQ&biw=1280&bih=899

gxhpainter2
05-22-2014, 03:50 AM
Caesar thanks for elaborating I will investigate further...:cool::cool: I hope others here do as well.

D Akey
05-22-2014, 04:05 AM
Great links Caesar. Too bad the computer is so disguising of technique owing to scale and the ability to go in and see detail.

In the earliest days of photography the photographers tried to make their photos look like paintings, and at some point artists started being influenced by what photographic effects were available. . . and printing too. . . Now with computer filters and all that there's another element added to the evolution. It's a real cross-pollenization (or 'mix of influences' in case there's no translation. My screen spell checker is telling me 'cross-pollenization' is not a word, so it may not work in online translators.)

Anyway, the whole parallel between grainy color from old printing processes and pointillism has always been obvious to me, though how the people in those days came to it I can't say exactly. But I still like the look where people went in with brushes and created these very intriguing paintings. To do it exactly how Seurat did it would be like putting on clothes from the 1890s. It instantly takes you back to that original context. But when it's varied in interesting new ways, it revives it - new life.

gxhpainter2
05-22-2014, 05:04 AM
Great links Caesar. Too bad the computer is so disguising of technique owing to scale and the ability to go in and see detail.

In the earliest days of photography the photographers tried to make their photos look like paintings, and at some point artists started being influenced by what photographic effects were available. . . and printing too. . . Now with computer filters and all that there's another element added to the evolution. It's a real cross-pollenization (or 'mix of influences' in case there's no translation. My screen spell checker is telling me 'cross-pollenization' is not a word, so it may not work in online translators.)

Anyway, the whole parallel between grainy color from old printing processes and pointillism has always been obvious to me, though how the people in those days came to it I can't say exactly. But I still like the look where people went in with brushes and created these very intriguing paintings. To do it exactly how Seurat did it would be like putting on clothes from the 1890s. It instantly takes you back to that original context. But when it's varied in interesting new ways, it revives it - new life. interesting points... during the show I was watching mentioned the impact of photography on the artists at the time.. I must confess that I got into digital photography many years ago now with the intent of taking the photo and making them like paintings! talk about coming full circle. I fell under the magic spell of photoshop and corel painter in their ability to take photographs and translate the photographic language into a painterly metaphor. I still like to fool around with that... just too tempting an area for me to ignore. I know for awhile we had a few people on this forum that did 'photo manipulation' as they called it, and I always enjoyed how they used AR to that end. :cool::cool::):)

byroncallas
05-22-2014, 10:43 AM
I think Seurat would much appreciate. :)

jibes
05-22-2014, 12:03 PM
Gary
Excellent work! I hope you didn't have to paint each little dot! :)

gxhpainter2
05-23-2014, 03:20 AM
I think Seurat would much appreciate. :) thank you Byron!... it would be fascinating to see what artists from 100 - 150 years ago would be doing with ArtRage and the digital medium.


Gary
Excellent work! I hope you didn't have to paint each little dot! :) LOL well actually I did Neal, although I just did about 4 different layers and then copied, flipped and changes to blending modes generates the dense feeling of this work.