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View Full Version : Advice on possible next graphics tablet...



Kyle
12-02-2013, 06:58 AM
Hello Folks!

My very first post on this site! I tried the ArtRage demo last night, and within 5 min. I knew that I was "in love" with the program. I immediately purchased it, and have been having a terrific time with it. It's challenging to describe to my wife just how fantastic this program is - it reminds me SO much of all the years that I spent oil painting, yet without any of the toxic fumes, the time consumed with stretching/priming canvas, washing out equipment, the disposal costs, etc., etc. Furthermore, I have much greater control of what I want to achieve, and yet without having to do 3-4 clicks to get the settings I desire. WOW! I love this program! :D

I have a very old Intuos2 that virtually very few companies supply proper support to. Out of all the free graphics programs that I use, exactly one supports its pressure sensitivity: Paint Tool Sai. And just to get that to work properly, I had to do a huge song and dance with my Win. 7 64-bit operating system so that its auto-update ignores updating devices. One of The Main reasons why I didn't hesitate to purchase ArtRage is that it too supplied support for my Intuos2. Prior to my purchasing ArtRage, I was just looking at getting a new graphics pad that is likely to have its pressure sensitivity supported in more programs. Our budget is very tight, so I'm trying to avoid a Wacom at this time.

If you would be so kind, please let me know what your experiences are with the following tablets. If you heard from VERY reliable sources that a certain model is "junk" please pass that info on to me as well (I've been reading all of the reviews, but I'd rather know what you know).

My main concerns are:
Is it compatible with Win. 7 64-bit Professional operating system (Win. 8 64-bit as well, but Win. 7 64-bit is my primary concern)?
Is its pressure sensitivity recognized in ArtRage and free software such as Paint.NET, Gimp, Inkscape, Paint Tool Sai, FireAlpaca, etc.?
Does it support tilt, and if so, does it do so accurately?
Is the cursor properly centered to the stylus?
Does it accurately pickup/convey the stylus' movement and pressure without having to press hard on the device?
Does its buttons hold up well to repeated usage?
Is it durably made (doesn't fall apart at the seams if dropped, USB cable is solid, etc.)?

Models I'm currently looking at:
*Please note that I had links embedded in this post, but because it's my very first post, the site won't let me supply links due to my possibly being a "spammer."* Sorry for the hassle! :(

Huion 8 ExpressKey 10 x 6 Inches Graphics Drawing Tablet - H610

Turcom Tursion 10 x 6.25 Inches Graphic Drawing Tablet (TS-6610H) from looking at the Turcom's images, it looks identical to the above Huion - am I correct on this, or...?

Monoprice MP1060-HA60 Graphic Drawing Tablet This model has a pressure sensitivity of 1024, but how noticeable will that actually be in a finished image compared to a sensitivity of 2048? Will the transitions be "noticeably" more jagged, or...?

And finally, if you have suggestions for models other than these, please supply a link and list reasons for why you enjoy the product. I'm hoping for something between the $50-75 range, but I might be able to scrape up to $100 if it's "really" worth it.

Thank you all in advance!
Kyle
:)

paintedtulip
12-29-2013, 02:52 PM
Well, I'm completely bummed no one has answered Kyle's question. Particularly since he has asked exactly the same question I wanted to except way better and more detailed. Does anyone have advice on using non-wacum tablets for us?
Thanks from another new member
Melissa
Painted Tulip

copespeak
12-29-2013, 06:44 PM
I would love to help, but I have an Intuos 4 and love it. Hopefully someone might come along with some comments.

Juz
12-29-2013, 07:13 PM
With regard to 2048 v 1024 pressure levels, you may see a barely noticeable improvement in the pickup of the start of a stroke, but aside from that the difference is pretty negligible. If it helps put it in perspective, this guy (http://daarken.com/), has been producing magic the gathering cards on an ep121 tablet (256 pressure levels) until recently.

If it were me buying one of these tablets I'd have a couple of additional questions:
- does the pen need batteries, if so what type/lifespan... and how did that affect the balance of the pen in my hand while drawing. Is there any crazy behaviour as the batteries near their end.
- what is the resolution of the digitizer (important for how well it tracks the pen)
- are there any known driver issues or conflicts with my intended software
- how frequently are the drivers updated

I think I may have seen a thread or two on the monoprice tablet with artrage in the technical section so it may be worth having a dig around

Best of luck :)

markw
12-30-2013, 06:44 AM
Juz raises some good points to consider in his post and I'm not sure there is much difference these days between tablets when it comes to the actual hardware, pressure sensitivity and response times etc…
The only thing in that respect about my Intuos4 I couldn't work without is the 'Touch Wheel', perfect for zooming & rotating the canvas as I go. Oh, and no batteries are needed for the pen.
But what I really like about Wacom are the drivers.
Wacom drivers tend to be the first a graphics app developer will consider when doing there coding.
All the Wacom tablets keys, the pen buttons and the touch wheel can be given unique functions that are specific to the app you are using at the time. Switch to another app and you can set different functions for the same keys. And it will remember for the next time. Do not underestimate how tiresome it can get if you always have to rest hot keys just because you switched apps!
Also all your custom hot keys can be saved as a backup file, so should disaster strike its really easy to get everything back just the way you had it.

As for which size, I'm very happy with the Intuos Medium. I did considered the Large but the larger "footprint" of it on my work area (and yes the extra money) tipped me towards the Medium.
If you are coming from traditional painting/drawing and are used to using broad arm movements as you work, then the Large may feel a bit more natural.
But in reality I found that as its possible to zoom in and out of digital work the actual physical size of the drawing area is not that important, as it all becomes relative to how fare in or out I have zoomed.
Finally a couple of other things that just came to mind, Wacoms work well with multiple monitors and mapping what area of the tablet works with which monitor. Or you can just assign the tablet to one monitor.

paintedtulip
12-30-2013, 07:44 AM
Thank you Mark, very helpful to know and understand that the buttons can be programed for each software program. This is something Wacum could explain a little better!
Thanks for adding about the size, I may still go for the large as I only want to do this once until it dies! I'm wanting stuff to last as looooonnnnngggg as possible.

Juz
12-30-2013, 02:03 PM
I found a review by an artist for the monoprice tablet... I'm linking it here as the artist does provide contact information.
http://frenden.com/post/31659364200/the-little-monoprice-graphics-tablet-that-could

@paintedtulip Wacom only offer that functionality on their intuos and cintiq line of products drivers. A large part of my decision to upgrade from an Asus ep121 (Wacom penenabled) to a Wacom cintiqcompanion (aside from obvious hardware improvements) was how much headache the watered down Wacom driver is on the ep121. Another reason was the hardware express keys Mark described (saves me writing scripts for modifier keys).

If you were a family member I'd advise trying to find a deal on a second hand intuos 4 on conceptart.org or ebay or such. Mainly to not have headaches with drivers etc. In my 20 years of working as a digital designer, I've never seen anyone use anything but Wacom... If you need to be on the racetrack, you don't want to be spending too much time in the pits.

Arjen Vriezekolk
01-04-2014, 04:08 AM
Try the Hanvon artmaster3...
Using it myself and with a price tag of around 300 euros it's cheap and very very good!!

http://www.hanvon.com/en/products/tablets/products_artmaster_iii.html

Regards,

Arjen Vriezekolk

Kyle
01-05-2014, 03:22 PM
Thank you for all of the replies so far.

All of the "big" sales are now over, so I'm just going to sit, wait, and observe for a while before taking any action towards purchasing a new graphics tablet.

In the meantime, I'm happy to have this thread stay open for those who feel like posting their praises for the graphics tablet they're using. It may not prove immediately useful to me, but perhaps to someone else...

:)

Enug
01-26-2014, 08:23 PM
Hello Folks!

My main concerns are:
Is it compatible with Win. 7 64-bit Professional operating system (Win. 8 64-bit as well, but Win. 7 64-bit is my primary concern)?
Is its pressure sensitivity recognized in ArtRage and free software such as Paint.NET, Gimp, Inkscape, Paint Tool Sai, FireAlpaca, etc.?
Does it support tilt, and if so, does it do so accurately?
Is the cursor properly centered to the stylus?
Does it accurately pickup/convey the stylus' movement and pressure without having to press hard on the device?
Does its buttons hold up well to repeated usage?
Is it durably made (doesn't fall apart at the seams if dropped, USB cable is solid, etc.)?

Models I'm currently looking at:
Huion 8 ExpressKey 10 x 6 Inches Graphics Drawing Tablet - H610



As a new member, I have just come across this post. I don't know how much my experience will help someone to make a decision about purchasing a non-Wacom graphic tablet.

I have only quoted part of your original post.

I was also in the market for a new tablet - my current one being a Bamboo One. I was all set to buy an Intuous Medium but after researching came across the Huion tablet mentioned above. I didn't know there were alternatives to Wacom and after reading reviews (Aaron Rutten - Youtube mainly) on the various tablets, settled on the Huion H610.

The tablet arrived just after Christmas so I've only had it a few weeks. I must point out that I have only been digital painting with ArtRage for about 12mths. Previously I was a PSP user for a number of years. However, I am pleased with the Huion - it's larger than the Intuous medium and a tiny fraction of the price.

There is no pen tilt and that may be important to you. I don't draw and with the painting tools, for me, it's not important. The pen has a battery and I find it is well weighted for me. I have two monitors and have mapped it to my main monitor. I have Windows8 - 64bit. The Huion has the same pressure sensitivity as the Intuos and I find the stylus/cursor accurate. I haven't as yet used the 8 express keys or the 16 shortcut keys - I'm left-handed and I think with the keys on the left side of the tablet it really wouldn't work well for me. You can adjust the pen to your pressure. I consider the tablet well made and clean looking - and similiar in appearance to the Intuous.

In conclusion at a price of less than Aud$70 it was worth trying something different.

Orkhan
03-02-2014, 11:12 AM
I got it in the middle of the last year, after prolong searching, asking around (and also consulting and many thanks to Arjen)... The pros: (number 1 is the price, altough it was a gift from my sister, that's why when i asked for the medium i got the large so I had to redesign my whole working place)) driver works just fine with my machine (i7 Sandy bridge laptop with 8Gb RAM, and GT555M graphic card) win 7 based. Tilt and pressure sensitivity perfect, 2 bateryles pens (not different characteristic, but different design and weight), spare nibs placed in the pen holder (6 black pcs), 8 asignable keys, jogwheel (just as Wacom), ambidextrous desing and power contact, long cord. And, if it ever matters, I cut out the inner bottom af the packaging and transformed into the perfect dustcover.
Hope it helps.

images from the working space (with the "dustcover on"
79652

aaand off
79653

aaand the command centre :-)
79654

Arjen Vriezekolk
03-08-2014, 12:40 AM
Hope you create many fine art with your Hanvon Orkhan!

I enjoy it a great deal!

Regards,

Arjen

Holly
04-13-2015, 03:32 AM
This is my first time replying, so I hope I'm doing it right. A friend gave me a Huion 580. It's very basic... no express keys, but I keep it sitting slightly to the right over my laptop keyboard so I have the shift key, the z key, the s key and the alt key exposed. These keys give me easy access to the commands I most use....undo, save, changing brush sizes and grabbing color samples. I've not had another tablet before this one, and therefore nothing to compare it with, but it works very well. I've not had any problems with it thus far, though I've read that if you drop the pen it will not work after that. As such, I've been very careful with the pen and plan to buy a back up (less than $20 - and even as low as about $12 on Amazon). I know the 580 is not a specific model you asked about, but I think it's one model below the Huion model you did ask about. I'm sure the one you are considering has some short-cut buttons and that would be nice to have, though the way I've figured out around not having any is just as easy (I believe.) The Huion seems to be a solid construction, but I have been very careful with it. I too have been tight on funds for awhile now and need it to last. I would one day love to try a Wacom as I've heard over and over they are the best, but I have no complaints about the Huion. The surface texture of the tablet is similar to drawing paper and even the sound the pen makes over it sounds like when a pencil is going over drawing paper. I have no issues with this sound at all and most of the time I have music on as I paint so I don't hear it anyway (it isn't very loud.) I've had this tablet for about a month and half and use it quite a bit. I'm working on a line of children's books so I work a lot. I followed advice on installation I've found online, as Huion drivers installation can be tricky if not done right. It's important to install the drivers withOUT the tablet being connected. I too am using Windows 7. I installed once off their site and suspected they weren't in correctly as I wasn't getting pressure sensitivity and then uninstalled them and then reinstalled off the disk that came with the tablet and everything has been fine since then. So far it's been great. I have been working in AR so I can't vote for how the table works in the list of programs you mentioned, but I'm sure it works with the others too. I think this particular model of Huion might not work well with Photoshop, from things I've read. But I believe the higher level models of Huion work well with PS and the other programs too. :cool:





Hello Folks!

My very first post on this site! I tried the ArtRage demo last night, and within 5 min. I knew that I was "in love" with the program. I immediately purchased it, and have been having a terrific time with it. It's challenging to describe to my wife just how fantastic this program is - it reminds me SO much of all the years that I spent oil painting, yet without any of the toxic fumes, the time consumed with stretching/priming canvas, washing out equipment, the disposal costs, etc., etc. Furthermore, I have much greater control of what I want to achieve, and yet without having to do 3-4 clicks to get the settings I desire. WOW! I love this program! :D

I have a very old Intuos2 that virtually very few companies supply proper support to. Out of all the free graphics programs that I use, exactly one supports its pressure sensitivity: Paint Tool Sai. And just to get that to work properly, I had to do a huge song and dance with my Win. 7 64-bit operating system so that its auto-update ignores updating devices. One of The Main reasons why I didn't hesitate to purchase ArtRage is that it too supplied support for my Intuos2. Prior to my purchasing ArtRage, I was just looking at getting a new graphics pad that is likely to have its pressure sensitivity supported in more programs. Our budget is very tight, so I'm trying to avoid a Wacom at this time.

If you would be so kind, please let me know what your experiences are with the following tablets. If you heard from VERY reliable sources that a certain model is "junk" please pass that info on to me as well (I've been reading all of the reviews, but I'd rather know what you know).

My main concerns are:
Is it compatible with Win. 7 64-bit Professional operating system (Win. 8 64-bit as well, but Win. 7 64-bit is my primary concern)?
Is its pressure sensitivity recognized in ArtRage and free software such as Paint.NET, Gimp, Inkscape, Paint Tool Sai, FireAlpaca, etc.?
Does it support tilt, and if so, does it do so accurately?
Is the cursor properly centered to the stylus?
Does it accurately pickup/convey the stylus' movement and pressure without having to press hard on the device?
Does its buttons hold up well to repeated usage?
Is it durably made (doesn't fall apart at the seams if dropped, USB cable is solid, etc.)?

Models I'm currently looking at:
*Please note that I had links embedded in this post, but because it's my very first post, the site won't let me supply links due to my possibly being a "spammer."* Sorry for the hassle! :(

Huion 8 ExpressKey 10 x 6 Inches Graphics Drawing Tablet - H610

Turcom Tursion 10 x 6.25 Inches Graphic Drawing Tablet (TS-6610H) from looking at the Turcom's images, it looks identical to the above Huion - am I correct on this, or...?

Monoprice MP1060-HA60 Graphic Drawing Tablet This model has a pressure sensitivity of 1024, but how noticeable will that actually be in a finished image compared to a sensitivity of 2048? Will the transitions be "noticeably" more jagged, or...?

And finally, if you have suggestions for models other than these, please supply a link and list reasons for why you enjoy the product. I'm hoping for something between the $50-75 range, but I might be able to scrape up to $100 if it's "really" worth it.

Thank you all in advance!
Kyle
:)

Delofasht
04-13-2015, 06:28 AM
I just wanted to chime in here and mention something I didn't really notice anyone say, which is a lack of tilt sensitivity on anything other than a Wacom. This might not make a difference to most, but to me it's the difference between painting digitally and painting traditionally, I also went out of the way to buy the ArtPen stylus for my Intuos Pro (when I upgraded from a bamboo) because I use that barrel rotation with my palette knife (locked rotation on) to control the rotation of the knife edge very accurately and concisely. These are features I was unable to find on any other product other than a Wacom, the Intuos Pro medium IS the best value for the number of features it has that cannot be replicated with a cheaper alternative.

This largely comes down to how well you know how you painted traditionally, and how much you want to emulate that, the extra money involved for me was worth every dime as it's equivalent to buying the necessary materials for starting in Oil painting (without ever getting the good stuff) and this is all top of the line hardware. Soon there will be other competitors that will have the tilt and tilt angle and rotation figured out, and maybe even the EMR technology that makes using batteries in the stylus unneeded, but until that time comes and it can be proven to be as good as or better than the Wacom equivalent I will be staying with my Wacom.

Good luck to you in which ever you choose!

Edit: Just noticed you'd already decided! Evidently I didn't read all the thread like I had thought I had. Ooops! hah! Also, your ArtMaster III is an excellent tablet, retrospectively I would have opted for it myself if I'd not saved 100$ on my purchase of my Intuos Pro Medium (assuming I'd have known it existed back then). The fact that it has all the important features of the Intuos makes it by far the best alternative on the market, I'm surprised they had the EMR battery-less stylus is awesome too! Good find, thanks for sharing I'd suggest this to anyone looking for an alternative in the future (I get asked about my tools from time to time).

- Delo