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chinapete
01-28-2013, 11:43 AM
Continuing adventures in classical Chinese landscape ... This is modeled on the monumental style Northern Song landscape paintings in hanging scroll format, such as those by Fan Kuan (fl. 990–1020) and Guo Xi (c.1020-1090) ... They thought that a landscape painting was something not be observed from the outside but to be lived from within ...


iPad 3, imported rice paper tinted in a layer to resemble discolored ancient silk, watercolor with opacity reduced to imitate faded inks, pencil set at 0 width to capture a calligraphic line across a textured surface (foreground) ...

RobertSWade
01-28-2013, 11:48 AM
I admire the journey you've set for yourself. Very Zen.
This is an admirable way-post.

chinapete
01-28-2013, 12:47 PM
Thanks again, RSW ... The word "journey" takes me back to Hesse (is he still being read, I wonder), especially those passages where he talks about painting ... Klingsor's Last Summer features an Expressionist painter; Journey to the East contains a brief haiku-like poem dedicated to Paul Klee, and in Magister Ludi, the apprentice Joseph Knecht visits the "Bamboo Grove," where his Chinese mentor initiates him into the mysteries of the hexagrams ... The Bamboo Grove, we are told, was laid out as a "Chinese dwarf garden" -- in that garden, they would sit together in early evening and contemplate the "gleam of twilight on the mountain peaks" ...

D Akey
01-28-2013, 04:28 PM
The black at the bottom makes it. Intriguing in its minimalism, even though the marks look as if painted with a sponge or even a single swipe of a terra cotta color conté crayon on toned paper. I like it.

Still reminds me of rocks in a cave by firelight. A primeval blank canvas found within the mountain where it is a view of what it is from without. Takes on a sort of existential consciousness tack of the Eye not being able to see itself. . . but we certainly have speculated over the centuries. . .

Feels like a totally unique tack to get to the mountain top that had been gotten to in the old days through washes and brushwork (I assume).

Caesar
01-28-2013, 11:35 PM
Your experiments and Your Chinese artistic sensitivity are full of grace and quite interesting to move our most delicate inner chords.

Alexandra
01-29-2013, 01:02 AM
Evocative of strength, resilience, and patience, all the while exuding an air of tranquility. Love it CPete.

gxhpainter2
01-29-2013, 04:25 AM
I like the format, it really emphasizes the height of the distant mountain, and the aged silk colors and faded inks are expertly done, your keen eye for color and nuance have worked magic here... such peace exudes from this.

justjean
01-29-2013, 06:35 AM
Pete, one can imagine themself to be sitting on a outcrop of rock inside that mountian and just drinking in the beauty and wonder of it all .

chinapete
01-29-2013, 07:07 AM
thanks for the kind comments everyone (and hi Caesar!) ...

I'm showing this exploded view of the stone outcropping at the foot of the mountain to illustrate one stage in the progression of "Lofty Mountains" -- actually, the final stage, because the stones were drawn in a moment of realization: they had to be there, it was kind of a zen thing ...

You can also see that one consequence of inspiration is that the facade of the mountain, which extends down behind the rocks, actually is visible through them ... This can be considered a "pentimento" (trace of an underdrawing or graphic element that shows up in the final painting, but shouldn't) ...

In the final version, much of the stone outcropping has been, well, cropped, and I added a few "dian" (dot) strokes to strengthen contours ...

hypotaxis
01-29-2013, 07:21 AM
Once again it is simplicity and elegance. Great!

Brett

pat1940
01-29-2013, 10:08 AM
Pete, this is so amazing to do this, I love chinese art and this is so delicate and a pleasure to view, I can almost see the china man as a silouette

D Akey
01-29-2013, 10:23 AM
thanks for the kind comments everyone (and hi Caesar!) ...

I'm showing this exploded view of the stone outcropping at the foot of the mountain to illustrate one stage in the progression of "Lofty Mountains" -- actually, the final stage, because the stones were drawn in a moment of realization: they had to be there, it was kind of a zen thing ...

You can also see that one consequence of inspiration is that the facade of the mountain, which extends down behind the rocks, actually is visible through them ... This can be considered a "pentimento" (trace of an underdrawing or graphic element that shows up in the final painting, but shouldn't) ...

In the final version, much of the stone outcropping has been, well, cropped, and I added a few "dian" (dot) strokes to strengthen contours ...

I decently had some dirt outcroppings under me fingernails which I had to crop.

Anyway, love the idea of pentimento. It's a word I've loved since hearing the audiobook Pentimento written by Lilian Hellman read on the radio many years back. I thought "what the heck is pentimento?" and discovered it is one of those words that is a wonderful metaphor in itself. It's as a submerged memory surfacing. And of course using it in the context of your paintings evokes many levels, not least of which is your remembering the ancient Chinese masters.

Very cool expansion, CP.