PDA

View Full Version : 2:00 am doodle



Gms9810
01-05-2013, 09:09 PM
2:00 am doodle. I wondered what it would like if I tried white on black. I also realized that I need to start drawing things without the outline.
72030

Gms9810
01-05-2013, 09:11 PM
Now that I see it here it reminds me of a velvet Elvis rug.

limey-g
01-06-2013, 01:00 AM
Hey well it worked out well and at least it is howling at the right time and to the moon.
Geoff

D Akey
01-06-2013, 03:17 AM
He ain't nothin' but a hound dog. . . cryin' all the time. . .

As to the outline thing, it's a choice of linear versus tonal or a combination of both.

Since you mentioned not outlining so much though, here's an example of someone who is all the way in the 'tonal' camp. Shows where it might lead. Georges Seurat who is most known for his color work, he being one of the foremost Pointillists, used his drawings to plot out that "dotted" process.

I always quite liked his drawings for the compositional language, something I had not come across quite the same. In fact, while I respect his color work, I prefer his black and white stuff. As a photographer yourself, you could probably appreciate them for their tonal photography quality - not photo realist, but I could see how photography could have suggested this direction.

http://www.google.com/search?num=10&hl=en&safe=off&site=imghp&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1120&bih=552&q=george+seurat+drawings&oq=george+seurat&gs_l=img.1.4.0l10.1437.7137.0.9877.17.11.2.4.4.0.1 41.1065.9j2.11.0...0.0...1ac.1._X7EgrBcn6Q

mannafig
01-06-2013, 03:58 AM
nice doodle it works well

Gms9810
01-06-2013, 01:05 PM
He ain't nothin' but a hound dog. . . cryin' all the time. . .

As to the outline thing, it's a choice of linear versus tonal or a combination of both.

Since you mentioned not outlining so much though, here's an example of someone who is all the way in the 'tonal' camp. Shows where it might lead. Georges Seurat who is most known for his color work, he being one of the foremost Pointillists, used his drawings to plot out that "dotted" process.

I always quite liked his drawings for the compositional language, something I had not come across quite the same. In fact, while I respect his color work, I prefer his black and white stuff. As a photographer yourself, you could probably appreciate them for their tonal photography quality - not photo realist, but I could see how photography could have suggested this direction.

http://www.google.com/search?num=10&hl=en&safe=off&site=imghp&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1120&bih=552&q=george+seurat+drawings&oq=george+seurat&gs_l=img.1.4.0l10.1437.7137.0.9877.17.11.2.4.4.0.1 41.1065.9j2.11.0...0.0...1ac.1._X7EgrBcn6Q

I wish i could draw like those (examples you posted), it must have taken a very long time to make even a simple drawing like them. I've been feeling like I've been rushing through the things I draw. I guess I'm stuck in the Bob Ross 30 minute time frame. The next thing I draw I'm going to take my time. There is an illustrator I follow on youtube named Mark Crilley, he draws quickly too. I'd like to be able to draw cartoon characters like he does so I could use it as a teaching aid. I think I just need to get this time notion out of my head and just take as long as it takes.