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hypotaxis
09-03-2012, 08:14 PM
The primrose path ...

Brett

pat1940
09-04-2012, 01:10 AM
oooooh I love this peaceful scene, lovely work, Brett

gxhpainter2
09-04-2012, 03:05 AM
a very sweet scene with the cane, scarf and glasses of wine...I like your colors and composition here.:):):)

GRSArts
09-04-2012, 04:18 AM
Love it. Very serene...

Rondo
09-04-2012, 04:39 AM
with a little imagination?? you can see different stages of life in this piece......here again its the art that lets work the imagination:)

hypotaxis
09-04-2012, 08:41 AM
Thanks everyone. Rondo I am really pleased you found a way to let your imagination roam in this picture :-)

Brett

chinapete
09-04-2012, 10:26 AM
... I am transported to ancient China ... a married couple was separated because the king wanted the husband's wife for himself ... after the couple's death, a note from the wife was found, she asked to be buried with her husband ... the king flew into a rage and had them buried a few yards apart, saying, You speak of eternal love, if you can come together, I will not stand in the way ... Eventually, two great trees grew up, one from each site, their roots interlocked and their branches intertwined, and have remained so to this day ...

hypotaxis
09-04-2012, 05:35 PM
That's a good story Chinapete, might be good to paint too. It sounds like it's out of Ovid's Metamorphoses.

Brett

D Akey
09-04-2012, 05:54 PM
What a great style. Love how you used the watercolor effect.

coops
09-05-2012, 01:25 AM
Such a delicate and charming painting, love the way you did the floor, well done:)

chinapete
09-05-2012, 01:50 AM
That's a good story Chinapete, might be good to paint too. It sounds like it's out of Ovid's Metamorphoses.

Brett

hi Brett ... you can read the story of Han Ping and his wife in the collected tales of the supernatural by Gan Bao, a 4th c. Chinese historian ... although both Ovid and Gan Bao write about transformation, Ovid's material is based in creation myth, while Gan Bao believed that the events he was describing actually happened ... when I first looked at "Lovers," I thought of the Japanese tradition of "pictures of the floating world" -- those famous woodcuts depicting fleeting beauty -- because the foreground as you've painted it is delicately transparent, and the objects seem to float ... also the linear perspective does make one think of a vanishing point ... but I mentioned the Chinese story because of the single vine, it seemed to be reaching out to embrace an absent lover ...

Steve B
09-05-2012, 03:53 AM
I agree, this is a nice image. Your work in Artrage has really moved along! Nice delicate linework. I like the wash you brought into the painting for general grit. Loose, layered color and brush work. Nice composition.

The work has a nice, easy going feel about it. I think it's interesting you left out any shadows or a direct light source. I see that the tablet is darker underneath, but other than that, it's very flat in terms of lighting. I think it works though, and fits the very loose, mellow style. Was it on purpose to keep things simple and fresh, or a happy accident?

hypotaxis
09-05-2012, 07:56 AM
.Was it on purpose to keep things simple and fresh, or a happy accident?

Hi Steve,

Thanks for your reply.

Well, as you know I am almost completely self-taught and I am still pretty new at this, so everything I paint has an element of serendipity; sometimes a very large element! I paint every day, I look at paintings and read endlessly and I hope I slowly get better. But it's largely experimentation and failure and trying again. It is difficult without any formal training to fall back on. I am continually re-inventing the wheel!

For this painting, we have a plastic chair like that on our deck and it happened to catch my eye. When I went back in I sketched it from memory and quite liked it, so I cloned another one and flipped it and put them together and that made me think of lovers and the rest slowly followed from that. I think I painted maybe four versions of this before I got it to a point that I liked well enough.

And the flatness is again inexperience. I find shadows difficult to do so that I am happy with them, so I work without them until I learn more.

Keeping things "simple and fresh" is just me. I paint like that most of the time. It's not really a choice it's just how the work comes out of me.

Brett

hypotaxis
09-05-2012, 04:09 PM
hi Brett ... you can read the story of Han Ping and his wife in the collected tales of the supernatural by Gan Bao, a 4th c. Chinese historian ... although both Ovid and Gan Bao write about transformation, Ovid's material is based in creation myth, while Gan Bao believed that the events he was describing actually happened ...
That's interesting about Gan Bao. I have never heard of him - which is not surprising given how little I know about ancient China.

Rain, ceaseless rain,
Great the river, deep the water,
Yet there is sunrise in my heart.

That's beautiful!

Also interesting that Ovid is based in creation myth. I hadn't thought of it that way.

Brett

Caesar
09-05-2012, 09:04 PM
This painting is marvellous and evocative in many ways, including the suggestion that the two lovers left for a while the two chairs to have some tender and intimate moments somewhere else ....:rolleyes::o

hypotaxis
09-05-2012, 09:15 PM
This painting is marvellous and evocative in many ways, including the suggestion that the two lovers left for a while the two chairs to have some tender and intimate moments somewhere else ....:rolleyes::o
My thoughts exactly Caesar Thank you!

chinapete
09-05-2012, 10:43 PM
Rain, ceaseless rain,
Great the river, deep the water,
Yet there is sunrise in my heart.


wow, you not only found the Gan Bao story, but you quoted the best lines ... it is a letter in the form of a poem that the young wife sends to her husband in prison ... and the words in Chinese are extremely erotic, she is saying her body has been taken, but in her heart she is faithful and she wants to be with her husband even after death ...

... so Lovers is mischievously erotic, as Caesar (hi Caesar!) points out, and because of the symbols -- the absence of the lovers, and the cane -- there is more than a suggestion that this is a late, if not a final, and maybe even an afterlife, fling ...

hypotaxis
09-06-2012, 11:19 AM
After all this I couldn't resist doing a painting of Han Ping and his wife (who sadly has no name). I usually leave abstracts to others but here is my take on this beautiful tale. It's alll watercolour and some knife work.

Brett

69998

chinapete
09-06-2012, 03:14 PM
... that's a very vivid painting, it would be great if you could expand a little on what you saw in the story that prompted such a strong reaction (if I may call it that) ...

... you noticed that even though much of the story is about Han Ping's wife -- she writes, she resists, she defies the king, etc. -- she isn't named directly ... I should add that it wasn't until modern times that a separate character for gender was introduced in Chinese, but because the pronunciation of both characters is identical, the subject of a typical spoken sentence still is assumed to be masculine, until contextualized ...

... over the last day or so, as I've been thinking about your painting and this conversation, it occurs to me that we don't have really good illustrations for many of the classics of Chinese literature ... of course, there are, but nothing on the order of Rackham's Alice in Wonderland, Rossetti's Tennyson, Beardsley's Greeks, etc. ... Maybe the cultural divide is much like Gan Bao's "great the river / deep the water," I don't know ... Actually, I'm working on illustrations to a classical story from the Chinese, and may post work-in-progress soon in the WIP section ...

... "Lovers" is very finely observed and painted ... if by any chance it seems to you that my reaction to your painting involved a bit of over-reaching, I could say symbols are highly-charged cultural artifacts that have a life beyond the artist's control ... Oedipus defeated the Sphinx by guessing that what walks on three legs in the evening is an old man with a cane ... and sometimes a cigar is more than a cigar :)

hypotaxis
09-06-2012, 03:54 PM
Well, firstly I like strong colours! but I started thinking about yin and yang (I love the Tao Te Ching and have several translations of it) and so I drew the red and blue "structures" in the centre with the red wrapped about the blue and then I added green for the trees and ochre for the earth and the black is branches and roots - sort of :-) It's more a doodle than anything serious! The story is deeply touching for me. It's a story of an ordinary peoples love defying the cold authority of the king. I like that! A lot.

I am a huge believer in symbols and the The Way, The Tao. I think we navigate our lives with symbols even if we don't recognise them as such. I spent many years working with severely abused children and they taught me to respect symbols. They use them to talk about their terrors, even if they don't recognise them as such :-)

Drawing illustrations for classical Chinese stories sound very interesting and I look forward to seeing what you are doing.

Brett

Caesar
09-06-2012, 07:42 PM
Dear CPete and Brett, since I'm from the same Italian region than Ovidius Naso (Ovid) I was pleased to know that citation two (Apuleius was a later Latin author too specifically addressing metamorphoses in his Asinus Aureus, the Golden Donkey, if I'm not wrong; there's also a comix erotic illustrated book from Milo Manara).
I didn't intend to be encessarily erotic in my description. Nor I missed the possible afterlife implication.
But, anyway, more simply and serenely, the two lovers may well be aged ones (see the stick) and just looking for privacy in an adjacent room where they may be kissing and caressing while talking sweetly to each other, i.e. out of sight.
Ovid certainly was dealing with myth (but that mythology was also still a shared institutional religion then) when he was celebrating spring wake up as caused by Venus (goddess of love, so a pertinent citation anyway, mother of Aeneas, so of all the Romans).
I would therefore end now citing a little bit of his poem De Rerum Natura in Latin, where it gets its music and rhythm:
Aeneadum genetrix, hominum divomque voluptas,
alma Venus, caeli subter labentia signa
quae mare navigerum, quae terras frugiferentis
concelebras, per te quoniam genus omne animantum
concipitur visitque exortum lumina solis:
te, dea, te fugiunt venti, te nubila caeli
adventumque tuum, tibi suavis daedala tellus
summittit flores, tibi rident aequora ponti
placatumque nitet diffuso lumine caelum.

chinapete
09-07-2012, 12:02 AM
... Caesar, you were right in your interpretation of the painting, and Brett said so ... And Ovid and his buddy Lucretius will be happy to know that their Latin is still being spoken and written, some two thousand years after their brilliant age passed :):)

limey-g
09-07-2012, 12:58 AM
Well done, a lovely scene that says to me " Of times gone by "
Geoff

Caesar
09-07-2012, 02:40 AM
Sorry dear Chinapete! You're right. :o I made a mistake and mixed Lucretius with Ovidius. I just hope I was right with Apuleius ... My Latin language and literature courses go back to some 40 years ago and, unfortunately, my mind starts getting confused by Al-zheimer rather than by Al-gebra. ;)
Actually Latin survived as the language of educated people, scientists, phylosophers and professors of all over Europe up to the XVII and part of the XVIII century. Today only catholics church uses it officially, but its heritage well present in many European languages both derived from its evolution or, as for English or German, influenced by its vocabulary or its structure.

hypotaxis
09-07-2012, 02:35 PM
Thanks LimeyG

Caesar I thought what you said was perfect. Nothing wrong with it at all :-)

Brett