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gxhpainter2
08-19-2012, 04:51 AM
I thought it might be of interest to see where I was artistically 35 years ago.. I did this oil for my Mother , its called "Returning Home". so you can see I did not always do abstracts but evolved very slowly in that direction.:):)

Here are a few fill in the blanks works each spanning 3-5 years from the first one "small oil-farm". ( they loaded out of order so I numbered to get the order right.)

1 - small-oil farm...this was some years later but I had begun to use brighter colors and a more impressionistic brush work

4 - Gouache Color Comp3... now almost fully in the abstract but still doing natural media.. watercolor, gouache.. this is egg tempera and charcoal on panel. done nearly twenty years ago..

2 - spring spirit .. moving to more symbolic and stylized works of nature...

3 - Village .. I have moved totally away from natural colors and entering a period of abstracting and stylization of brushwork and exploring color schemes.

limey-g
08-19-2012, 05:32 AM
I like this very much, maybe I am asking a too personal question, but what took you away from this type of work.
Geoff

gxhpainter2
08-19-2012, 06:38 AM
Geoff.. not too personal a question at all..and no simple answer, but I guess I got a bit bored..and I wanted to explore artistically more colors and use what I had learned to create shapes, objects and a less literal view of the world around me. like I said it was a slow process of defining the marks and colors.. at first I just dabbled around and was not overly successful but kept looking at all kinds of painting and tried to emulate artists whose work I was drawn to. and eventually have developed my own visual language. I still love works like yours and Brian Tinzo's and my work is still heavily inspired my nature.

Marilyn Anne
08-19-2012, 07:46 AM
Such a beautiful painting shows that you started fom a firm base. I can understand the explorations. Picasso did!

jibes
08-19-2012, 10:14 AM
Gary, I kind of suspected you were from a long background of painting. This is very very nice! Oil?

D Akey
08-20-2012, 04:03 AM
Wow. Bored? Interesting. That looks like it took some time to do. And a lot of fastidiousness.

How long did it take you to get to understand how to do something like this in your evolution as a painter? I'm curious because it looks heavily influenced by other works. (nothing wrong with that because we all do it until we hit our personal place.) Did you ever feel that this was your style or that you were just copying other people's chops?

I went through phases where I wanted to do a look in a painting copying this artists style and then that. And then when I got fairly good at it I popped off to a different look because I didn't see where else there was to go with it. The challenge, you see, was in the challenge of figuring out how they did it and doing it. But the problem for me was that it wasn't speaking from within me. It was somewhat superficial because I was trying to satisfy someone else's tastes.

Anyway this is a very accomplished looking painting. Bravo on that. Bet your mom loved it.

gxhpainter2
08-20-2012, 05:25 AM
Wow. Bored? Interesting. That looks like it took some time to do. And a lot of fastidiousness.

How long did it take you to get to understand how to do something like this in your evolution as a painter? I'm curious because it looks heavily influenced by other works. (nothing wrong with that because we all do it until we hit our personal place.) Did you ever feel that this was your style or that you were just copying other people's chops?

I went through phases where I wanted to do a look in a painting copying this artists style and then that. And then when I got fairly good at it I popped off to a different look because I didn't see where else there was to go with it. The challenge, you see, was in the challenge of figuring out how they did it and doing it. But the problem for me was that it wasn't speaking from within me. It was somewhat superficial because I was trying to satisfy someone else's tastes.

Anyway this is a very accomplished looking painting. Bravo on that. Bet your mom loved it. D Akey..well maybe bored was a bit harsh but landscape painting had less interest for me that it used to. by the time I did this I had been painting landscapes, etc for about 15 years and had picked up my style from looking at the Impressionist's for colors and Richard Schmidt for the brushwork I basically learned painting from reading books and going to galleries.At the time that I painted this piece I frequently did oil studies on site outside, and then later composed bits and pieces of them into works like this, which was made up. My friends and relatives loved this style of painting and I sold or gave all of them away. But works like Paul Klee, Miro, and Picasso, Asger Jorn really grabbed me around this time and I felt that there was a whole realm of painting in me that wanted out and did not want to be constrained by a style and success that had become comfortable.

D Akey
08-20-2012, 06:50 AM
That's really interesting. Well, between you and me and the lamp post, there's nothing wrong with success and comfort/security in that. That's called making a name and building a clientele. But I understand the luster wearing off.

Writers have mentioned similar things, feeling pigeon holed in a style and having gathered an audience that to whom they feel obligated to deliver the expected. So what those writers I heard speak (like Dean Koontz) of that is that they wrote under other names, which in fact they built up a whole different following. . . and they also did it when writing in genres that would lower their marketability where at some point they needed the money and which would had killed them when they got respectable. But it was all a way to learn their craft and how to write to deadlines and all that. I have a sneaking feeling their jumps were not so far as yours though, because commercial fiction writing is pretty much the same, just with different heroes and situations.

Anyway, thanks for answering so openly. Very intriguing moment for you. You did/do have some very good skills in that area. :):):):):):cool:

chinapete
08-20-2012, 07:46 AM
... this is the lamp post speaking :) ...

... gary and d akey, if I may ... when a work of art is done -- that is, when we stop fiddling with it and ignore it for a sufficiently long time, or sell it or give it away -- we immediately think of its defects, and persuade ourselves we could have done, should have been able to do, a better, or different kind of work ... we want to believe we are perfecting our art, after all, although most artists suffer from obsessive compulsions of one sort or another, if we were to write only "all work and no play makes jack etc." over and over, at some point we would realize the error of repetition, or others will say to us, that's not a new work of art, it's simply what you've done in the past ... just as collectively we believe progress is a necessary part of civilization, so we want our art to involve or reflect a degree of novelty ... this may drive us toward a tendency to "purification" -- the idea is to jettison all that doesn't work in favor of all that does ... but I believe art is "bricolage" -- the skillful use of whatever tools we have at hand to realize a persistent vision ...

pat1940
08-20-2012, 09:59 AM
Gary, that is some beautiful painting, your mom must have been so proud of you
I love to paint about anything right now, but my most disapointment in myself is that I always need a ref or 2 or3 and I wish that
I had the talent of imagination, like our dear Katie or Silvy, Anna and many more in this forum, by the time I get there I will be too old lol
The last few days I have gone crazy over Impressionism, so I use a ref but change it a little, so maybe that is a start:)

D Akey
08-20-2012, 11:57 AM
@ China Post. Yeah. Cool. We do what we do. And we live with the results.

I think an analogy can be drawn between constantly changing sexual partners vs. a long term relation. They both have advantages and disadvantages. And there are different personality types suited for both. And there are those who seek to have it both ways. But I wouldn't say that changing because one has 'go to' chops is bad or that it is merely being repetitive. I call it evolving when one builds on something that works and that it allows us to start way ahead and thereafter stretch beyond that.

For me it has always been that when doing something in a known way that new, further ideas come from that which lead me into new areas organically from something solid. It comes to life from getting solid in an area.

Just popping to something new for its own sake with little to build upon other than another artist's look, it often misses what was really happening in that original artist's life and world, and what was influencing them because the original artist probably evolved into it through total immersion. I mean many artists were they basing it on merely the look of a painting or two could paint blindfolded like Gaugin or Kandinsky or Pollock or Rothko or Kline. Or one can do stuff that's new just because nobody has done it before which may or may not yield good stuff. But until one makes it their own and does enough of it where it begins speaking to them about where to go next, it can be shallow and that gold mine can play out quickly leaving one with nowhere to go other than start over with another artist as the starting point.

Gary, it's nice to see you have been sticking to your new styles. You too Pete. I'm not saying either of you are in that category that I was talking about. But it's my experience of how different people take the journey. Sometimes just breaking free is the only way out of a tight loop. But it creates a new game that takes settling in and finding how it will shape up.

chinapete
08-20-2012, 12:16 PM
haha d akey that lamp post was made in china ...

... I'm stealing gary's post here, but I want to qualify or try to clarify for myself what you are saying ... it's important to remember that the experiments I engage are not so much a confrontation with new art styles, or anything I'm unfamiliar with, but an exploration of what is possible with the new world of technology-based art ... I know what I want, the idea is to try to get to it with a new set of tools ... many, even the most basic of tools, such as holding a pencil or a brush, don't yet seem well adapted for what I call natural gestures in drawing or painting ...

D Akey
08-20-2012, 07:04 PM
haha d akey that lamp post was made in china ...

... I'm stealing gary's post here, but I want to qualify or try to clarify for myself what you are saying ... it's important to remember that the experiments I engage are not so much a confrontation with new art styles, or anything I'm unfamiliar with, but an exploration of what is possible with the new world of technology-based art ... I know what I want, the idea is to try to get to it with a new set of tools ... many, even the most basic of tools, such as holding a pencil or a brush, don't yet seem well adapted for what I call natural gestures in drawing or painting ...

I don't want to speak for GXHpainter, but I seriously doubt he would mind Art discussion in his threads. But he'll be back hopefully soon to comment.

By the way, I like your ideas of bringing traditional methods to computer. I think that's one of the great points about ArtRage. It's taken the challenge very far indeed to do just that. And we users can then keep taking it farther and farther as we go.

semd74
08-20-2012, 07:32 PM
A very nice painting Gary...would love to see more of this type

coops
08-21-2012, 01:35 AM
What a beautiful painting and so much work has gone into it. Its a treasure:)

gxhpainter2
08-21-2012, 02:29 AM
haha d akey that lamp post was made in china ...

... I'm stealing gary's post here, but I want to qualify or try to clarify for myself what you are saying ... it's important to remember that the experiments I engage are not so much a confrontation with new art styles, or anything I'm unfamiliar with, but an exploration of what is possible with the new world of technology-based art ... I know what I want, the idea is to try to get to it with a new set of tools ... many, even the most basic of tools, such as holding a pencil or a brush, don't yet seem well adapted for what I call natural gestures in drawing or painting ... I absolutely agree here..I think that we should explore deeply all that is possible in this new "media" I think it provides an incredible opportunity and is in a way an equalizer in that the expense and necessary space needed for oils, acrylics etc is over come with some very simple tools ( a wacom tablet, a computer and AR). I like to see what is possible to emulate the natural media but also what is possible thru the science of image manipulations like Bert Monroy's exceptional work.


I don't want to speak for GXHpainter, but I seriously doubt he would mind Art discussion in his threads. But he'll be back hopefully soon to comment.

By the way, I like your ideas of bringing traditional methods to computer. I think that's one of the great points about ArtRage. It's taken the challenge very far indeed to do just that. And we users can then keep taking it farther and farther as we go. Heck no I am thrilled that you guys launched into to this discussion it think it is valuable and is not something we get to engage in ( atleast I don't in my normal day to day )..They reason I put this work up is to show that you never know where your artistic journey will take you if you stick to it and keep exploring with heart.


A very nice painting Gary...would love to see more of this type LOL well I might circle back and do landscapes again but I doubt they would look quite like this again..


What a beautiful painting and so much work has gone into it. Its a treasure:) Thanks so much Katie..

Steve B
08-21-2012, 03:04 AM
Great discussion Gxh. It's very cool you shared. The evolution of a mind is a fascinating thing! :)

I think sometimes the confusion comes when you only see sort of the beginning and ending of a journey. I'm sure there were all sorts of baby step in between that led you to where you are now. That's often what I really like about going to a gallery when they're having a show on a specific subject-- then you can see an artist in time. I think people sometimes forget that the one of the really interesting parts of a painting is that another human being made it, and that it came from their engagement with the world. That's often why I can find a painting, or a series of paintings done over time, really engaging even when I don't really "like" the work, per se-- because it's the human element that drives the interest.

Now, I happen to find your current work interesting, but it's still really a treat to see some earlier work done in such a different style. It would be, I'm sure, quite instructive (and a fascinating conversation to boot) if you were able to find a few other paintings over the years that showed your change and progression. I know that's sort of "giving you homework". Hahahaha! ...but it sounds so interesting, I thought I'd bring the idea up. :)

gxhpainter2
08-21-2012, 04:27 AM
Steve B.. thanks and I am glad you like this thread, and you bring up a good point one that might get overlooked. My transition from a Landscape painter to an abstractionist was indeed in many many baby steps or quantum jumps. I did a lot and I mean a lot of bridge paintings that were really not very good as I veered into and out of abstraction and realism.. I will dig through my archives and try to pick out a few of the representative steps along the way..:):)

gxhpainter2
08-24-2012, 07:36 AM
reviving this thread a bit..

Steve B
08-24-2012, 07:51 AM
That is a really fascinating progression! I want to look it over more before I really comment. I just wanted to also say that if you insert the images "in-line" as they call it here, you should be able to decide which order they go in, because you'll be able to grab and move them around within your "Reply to Thread" dialog box. Then you could put them all in the proper order for easy reference.

It's very cool that you've done this. I'm curious about influences, btw. Are those artists that you still really love generally abstract-- such as Klee, who you mentioned-- or do you still feel like you draw from certain famous representational artists that you might have loved in the past?

Also, I was curious about your love of painting and what drives you over time-- for instance, did you always like a certain thing about painting, and your style has slowly changed to better reflect that thing that you've always loved (say, the viscosity of paint, or the color, etc)? OR has what you've loved about painting changed over the years, and you've explored certain new modes of painting to better represent your changed feelings and desires?

screenpainter
08-24-2012, 08:48 PM
wonderful to see your early work Gary. some really fine stuff there. I was especially enthralled with the first too. Obviously you can hold your own as an impressionist in natural medium. very impressive works all.

D Akey
08-25-2012, 02:24 AM
It's a bit of a leap for me to go from these to where you were when you first began with ArtRage here in the forums. It's as if you changed tools and thus changed consciousness and of course your target was very different as well. The computer really allowed for rapid advancement owing to the speed and new tools you could process.

But I do see a somewhat direct evolution here in the old paintings. Was good stuff, but derivative as are most paintings on the planet. I can almost tell who you were looking at based on the paintings you did. But it was clear you were shedding your artistic skin.

Thanks for the context. All very nice stuff.

screenpainter
08-25-2012, 02:41 AM
D Akey I was thinking the same that I could almost identify the influences, for instance:

no. 1 Cezanne
no. 2 Van Gogh
no. 3 Kandinsky
no. 4 Gustav Klimt and a dash of Jean Miro perhaps.
no. 5 of course Marc Chagall. :)

For me no. 3 stands out to me as the precursor to the artist's contemporary work, but as you mentioned I think a bit is taken from all.

gxhpainter2
08-25-2012, 04:30 AM
That is a really fascinating progression! I want to look it over more before I really comment. I just wanted to also say that if you insert the images "in-line" as they call it here, you should be able to decide which order they go in, because you'll be able to grab and move them around within your "Reply to Thread" dialog box. Then you could put them all in the proper order for easy reference.

It's very cool that you've done this. I'm curious about influences, btw. Are those artists that you still really love generally abstract-- such as Klee, who you mentioned-- or do you still feel like you draw from certain famous representational artists that you might have loved in the past?

Also, I was curious about your love of painting and what drives you over time-- for instance, did you always like a certain thing about painting, and your style has slowly changed to better reflect that thing that you've always loved (say, the viscosity of paint, or the color, etc)? OR has what you've loved about painting changed over the years, and you've explored certain new modes of painting to better represent your changed feelings and desires? Steve.. D Akey and Albert have correctly identified the major influences of these works!...earlier I did a lot of work that mimicked George Inness and I still love his work and Richard Schmidt but more to the point of what drove me over time with painting was and still is color. I was struck at an early age ( 7-8 years old ) when I saw a beautiful painting of sky and I was amazed at the colors. to lay down a thick line of rich red, or blue or yellow. or see how the colors react and dance with each other is the motivational force for my work. I am not that good a draftsman so I have spent my painting career copying others styles as I reached a point where I understood the work. but always I was looking for a way to hang colors on some structure or form. So these days most all of my inspiration comes from abstract artists of the last 100 years or so.


wonderful to see your early work Gary. some really fine stuff there. I was especially enthralled with the first too. Obviously you can hold your own as an impressionist in natural medium. very impressive works all. thanks Albert.


It's a bit of a leap for me to go from these to where you were when you first began with ArtRage here in the forums. It's as if you changed tools and thus changed consciousness and of course your target was very different as well. The computer really allowed for rapid advancement owing to the speed and new tools you could process.

But I do see a somewhat direct evolution here in the old paintings. Was good stuff, but derivative as are most paintings on the planet. I can almost tell who you were looking at based on the paintings you did. But it was clear you were shedding your artistic skin.

Thanks for the context. All very nice stuff. D Akey.. yes these works predate my digital work by some 12-15 years. and I used Painter and Photoshop then.. and did a lot of very bad digital abstracts.. learning how to use the digital software to emulate painting.


D Akey I was thinking the same that I could almost identify the influences, for instance:

no. 1 Cezanne
no. 2 Van Gogh
no. 3 Kandinsky
no. 4 Gustav Klimt and a dash of Jean Miro perhaps.
no. 5 of course Marc Chagall. :)

For me no. 3 stands out to me as the precursor to the artist's contemporary work, but as you mentioned I think a bit is taken from all. Albert.. you are 100% spot on..:cool::cool::cool::cool:

chinapete
08-25-2012, 06:39 AM
gary ... I'm relieved to see there is no anxiety of influence here :cool: (not sure what that emoticon means, but it looks cool) ... the tradition is a gift, not a burden ... artists we admire should free us to be better ... or at least to see things differently ... integrate and expand, reflect and deepen ...

... if we take biological evolution as a model for progress in art, then your next painting is guaranteed to be as random as the one before it ... I'm not a strict evolutionist in that sense ... I'm more of the moment ... recently I've shifted to creating paintings that cannot be reproduced ... "riverrun" is a good example, it cannot be printed, it can't be resized or in any way manipulated without becoming something else, it can only be viewed online where it is at the moment it is seen ... the title, by the way, is the first word in Joyce's Finnegans Wake, and is a continuation of the sentence that "ends" the novel (in quotation marks because the novel has no ending) ... and just as in the geometry of a circle, I am always at the end of something no matter where I begin ...