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chinapete
06-19-2012, 10:21 AM
... the character "我" (wo), meaning "I, me, self," in the style of Huang Tingjian, 12th c., from a line in a poem by Han Shan (8th c.), "I have seen the waters of the Huang River" (我見黃河水) ...

... not calligraphy, but an attempt to reproduce the elements in digital media ...

Caesar
06-19-2012, 09:38 PM
I guess ancient chines calligraphy can be hardly reproduced in its confident elegance, but You did well.
Apparently there are differences on the left side of the ideogram from todays corresponding typographic character. I was also wondering, from Your words and translation, how chinese language express some sort of past tense (simple, perfect etc. to stick to the few ones of English, instead than present):confused::rolleyes:

chinapete
06-20-2012, 02:48 AM
Caesar, thanks ...


Cursive is a form of high-speed writing, imagine if you could use only block print letters for your signature, it would be very slow and annoying to sign anything ... So it is with Chinese calligraphy, it's a kind of shorthand for writing characters, and the idea is to reduce the number of strokes by combining them, but it's much more than that, it's an artform in itself, because each character (unlike each letter in alphabetic systems), is meaningful, and at the same time reveals something about the writer's personality ...


As you point out, literally the Chinese means "I see the waters ..." But we know that when Han Shan wrote the line he was living as a mountain recluse, far away from worldly life ... In the poem, he gives a long list of things he is remembering, and so it is reasonable to match the meaning of the words with the appropriate tense in English ...

Steve B
06-20-2012, 03:21 AM
What tool are you using Chinapete? Chalk, I presume, like normal for you? and what kind of layer texture or canvas in combination with it to get the nice soft bit of texture here and there? There's also some nice variance in line width from beginning to end of a stroke's direction, which I don't get much when I use that tool.

chinapete
06-20-2012, 03:46 AM
What tool are you using Chinapete? Chalk, I presume, like normal for you? and what kind of layer texture or canvas in combination with it to get the nice soft bit of texture here and there? There's also some nice variance in line width from beginning to end of a stroke's direction, which I don't get much when I use that tool.

Hi Steve,

Each stroke actually is made of much smaller strokes designed to give the impression of fluidity ... it's all very much in the experimental stages, as is most of my work ... For this study, I used the basic oil brush tool on the iPhone, set at varying widths ... there is only one layer on basic paper, but there is some post-work involved to get to the level of representing ink on paper (mostly done in resizing and recoloring the image on the iPad, then reworking on the iPhone) and of course the image was offset against a larger background I borrowed from traditional Chinese painting ... What can be done in less than a second in the real world turns out to require hours of careful manipulation in the digital world :) ... I've attached an image of the sort of strokes that encouraged me to go down this path ...