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gxhpainter2
02-20-2012, 11:38 AM
a venture into an expressionistic landscape..

S5T68IS2TA
02-20-2012, 12:39 PM
Real nice composition of colors. Love these types of paint jobs. They are straight to the point. I mean, clear, precise, and diffeent. Nice job!

MSIE
02-20-2012, 02:11 PM
funny that the red barn was the last thing I looked at when seeing your painting! :cool: :D
love your brush strokes and textures! :)

coops
02-20-2012, 10:32 PM
Red barn by the river which is moving sooooooo fast, another great one Gary:)

Alexandra
02-21-2012, 01:15 AM
This one especially appeals to me Gary. I have a "thing" for red barns.:D A wonderful piece!

gxhpainter2
02-21-2012, 05:33 AM
Lou.. thanks I am glad you like this , and thanks for commenting.
Katie and Anj.. glad you like this..was a little off my beating path.
Alexandra..not often I do "barn" paintings anymore although I must confess I did quite a few when I was doing mostly watercolors..:cool::cool::D Oregon being mostly farm and ranch country has lots and lots of them

screenpainter
02-21-2012, 10:03 AM
I like this Fauvian foray into the world between impression and reality. All in all, it makes a pretty piece on a wall.

gxhpainter2
02-22-2012, 10:18 AM
Albert.. thanks again.. I do have a fondness for paintings from the Fauvism period ..:)

jibes
02-22-2012, 04:35 PM
I love this one Gary! So interesting!

Caesar
02-22-2012, 10:10 PM
You perfectly succeeded in Your scope and got a most valuable artpiece, I find!

gxhpainter2
02-23-2012, 05:00 AM
Thanks Neal.. so glad you like it I was trying to use my abstraction skills on a "typical landscape" subject..:):)

Caesar.. thanks mate...always appreciate you checking in on my efforts.:):)

silvy
02-23-2012, 05:26 AM
Love the red barn:):)

Sketchism71
02-23-2012, 05:43 AM
This is awesome! I want to hang it in my kitchen! Your work just amazes me:eek:

D Akey
02-23-2012, 06:48 AM
First off, let me say this is pretty cool as a new direction. But I'm going to take you to task just a little.

I like it. Just there is something I want to point out right off, if I may. I think looking to follow a format is leading you more than you making a picture. It's a little like trying to talk with an accent. It can be spotted by anyone who actually speaks in that dialect because there are always tell tale sounds that slip back to your normal accent. And it feels awkward.

Were I not aware of your attempt to incorporate Expressionism, I probably wouldn't have had that brought to mind. But since you revealed that, I will comment more generally about taking on a style.

What are you expressing with your Expressionism? I think that's the question to be asking yourself when taking on a style that is anchored in the history of Art as being about suffering (like playing the Blues).

Using the forms is fair enough, but so long as you are, select based on something other than the visual bending and distorting. I mean for the average commercial Joe, that's plenty, but you're aiming deeper than that, Gary.

So if you are making a comment on the demise of the private farmer with agri-business pushing the little guy into ruin, that's one spin. If it's an attempt to do a quaint rural scene with a little Chagall tossed into your normal style, that's another. And the questions go on from there, questions which you can ask yourself after the first couple paintings in this direction, seeing where they're pointing.

On the visual only side of things, I think the way you've distorted is inconsistent throughout the painting. And that's fine if it's intentional. But I would offer that you might want to look at the way you are moving things around the canvas. I know the Expressionists are not known for rhythmic consistency, but it's something you may want to consider sooner or later. Regardless of where you're going with your evolution, it lends a level of expertise to the mix. . . unless it is one of those rules that you want to break. Not having it as a quality of one's work is a harder sell though IMHO.

Anyway, these are some of my thoughts on where you are right now and where you are looking. I am as ever offering this for your consideration only.

chinapete
02-23-2012, 07:44 AM
Not counting the barn, I see at least two other expressive faces and figures ...

gxhpainter2
02-24-2012, 07:00 AM
D Akey... thanks my friend for the comments and insightful observations... implying that there was an Expressionistic bent to this was probably a bit of sloppy art history on my part more than anything :o.

This particular work started and stopped in several directions and it was a REAL struggle. so much conficting feelings and this sat around for several days with me not know what I was really trying to do.. ( usually I have a very clear idea or concept ).. so in the end I kind of stuck some lipstick on this pig and tried to make it bend into a quasi Chagall type work, which in the end did give me some ideas to work with. You certainly picked up on the conflict and the inconsistent nature of this work.. I wish I had a better explanation but hey sometimes you head one way with a painting and things spin out of control.. ( atleast for me that can happen ).. so you gave me much to mull over and I appreciate that :):)..

D Akey
02-24-2012, 07:33 AM
Hey, fair enough. That's part of the creative process.

You might, for fun sometime, try plotting a rhythm to this kind of broad subjective painting ahead of time and see what happens (like a sketch artist will do a quick couple lines for action and proportion). You are doing that some with your geometric work to some degree already. And you can probably see where it has been very successful.

One of the things that comes to mind in looking at this pic that may have held it together a little more is the idea of dropping some ink into a glass of water and how the clouds of color pattern out. That's merely one little possibility of how things can swirl about for a curving, billowy compositional spine to construct a pic around. But it's merely a thought.

Mechanically to get specific and as a point of awareness, I would recommend that you be mindful of creating arrow shapes within your pic that quickly eject the eye from the canvas. The sorta loud red barn is doing it pointing to the upper left, and there is that blue wedge in the middle pointing off and down as well.

All that being said, there is a heck of a lot of very cool stuff going on in this picture. I really like the color and marks are very cool. I like the variety. And it has a bit of a sparkly quality to it. So my comments are merely observations like weather balloons. And weathermen have been known to be laughably wrong. :D

Anyway, very groovy stuff.

chinapete
02-24-2012, 08:35 AM
I might have called this painting "Van Gogh on the road to Villa R"
:-)

gxhpainter2
02-24-2012, 08:51 AM
chinapete... LOL.. and I think that would be a much more fitting title !..:D:D thanks for both your comments

Marilyn Anne
02-24-2012, 09:13 AM
I have enjoyed looking at many of your abstract paintings. I appreciate the color and design.

screenpainter
02-24-2012, 11:11 AM
I'm with Eddie. I'd buy it. I'd hang it. I think your dialect is fine and your music seems to be enjoyed by many so play on. :) I think you just know the right rifts to play. As far as the barn pointing off canvas... one's eye can follow the slant of the roof back into the composition or take the horizontal line expressway works as well.
I think the artist runs into trouble in going too close to the edge of mixing the literal with abstract because then it becomes too easy for the critic to dismiss, and or, ignore it. I don't see this as any kind of new direction, but rather the same wonderful instruments you play very well. Picasso got to the point where a scribble or jots would suffice and so did Matisse and Chagall. I totally disagree that art must somehow make some profound comment. Picasso's most profound statement was in Guernica, but certainly doesn't dismiss the whole body of work that makes no social commentary at all unless it is about endlessly chasing skirts or fighting bulls.
If art is a visual music...I don't hear any notes off key in this work at all.
Most likely the only mistake I would say was in naming it. You stated the obvious, after the fact, which really is not the strength of the picture. Like MSIE pointed out, the last thing noticed was the barn. Had you named it the intrusion or the conflict... or encroachment or echoes of my past, and then left out the part about venturing into expressionistic landscape (when did you leave?) we probably wouldn't be having this conversation.:)

D Akey
02-24-2012, 12:42 PM
screenpainter said:
I'm with Eddie. I'd buy it. I'd hang it. I think your dialect is fine and your music seems to be enjoyed by many so play on. :) I think you just know the right rifts to play. As far as the barn pointing off canvas... one's eye can follow the slant of the roof back into the composition or take the horizontal line expressway works as well.
I think the artist runs into trouble in going too close to the edge of mixing the literal with abstract because then it becomes too easy for the critic to dismiss, and or, ignore it. I don't see this as any kind of new direction, but rather the same wonderful instruments you play very well. Picasso got to the point where a scribble or jots would suffice and so did Matisse and Chagall. I totally disagree that art must somehow make some profound comment. Picasso's most profound statement was in Guernica, but certainly doesn't dismiss the whole body of work that makes no social commentary at all unless it is about endlessly chasing skirts or fighting bulls.
If art is a visual music...I don't hear any notes off key in this work at all.
Most likely the only mistake I would say was in naming it. You stated the obvious, after the fact, which really is not the strength of the picture. Like MSIE pointed out, the last thing noticed was the barn. Had you named it the intrusion or the conflict... or encroachment or echoes of my past, and then left out the part about venturing into expressionistic landscape (when did you leave?) we probably wouldn't be having this conversation.:)

==============

And that's why actually saying more than a cookie cutter "Awesome" or worse yet, saying nothing it all, is of some value.

So continue to speak your peace, screenpainter. It's a gift to the artist and the rest of the community to share your point of view, in the open when it suits you, or in private if you prefer. By the way, your personal mailbox is full, so sadly I cannot communicate with you there.

As to your pejorative use of the word critic, as you've included in your comments when you disagree, it implies something that isn't actually accurate. As I've told you before the last time you took umbrage on a similar point.

I am a critic in the sense that I critique, more of a "have you considered. . . ?" kind of commentator as I've been doing since I was in Art School, where it was always seen as a service, and never to my knowledge about cutting or slighting someone. It's an admission that there is room to grow. The only absolute about Art is that there are no absolutes, though you may disagree on that point. But I'm casual about helping, though I comment a lot which is getting a little old. But I am precise from my perspective, especially when the person to whom I am commenting has acknowledged the value of my comments and have repeatedly asked me to. But I have resisted doing my talking in private chat precisely in order to allow disagreement -- not because I like to argue, but because it serves the painter to hear different points of view to help them expand their vision. But you know what they say about free advice.

Now if someone is willing to pay money for a painting, who's to argue, eh? Especially when it's seconded. You almost sound like a collector defending your collection. I think in a way that makes you the dreaded critic.

So be my guest, set the world on fire, GZ! I'll enjoy your commentary now that you're coming out.

It's good for an artist to be passionate, if that passion gets channeled well. It still comes down to what the artist chooses to do, though, and I have always encouraged that level of integrity (operative word is 'encouraged'). It's the only sure fire way of finding who they are, otherwise it's merely flitting about listening to everyone else. Having something concrete and in the open gives someone something to make a clear determination, even if it's to find they don't like it.

The forms are just forms as a playroom to work ourselves out like in a gym. It's the artist who is ultimately responsible for their 'body's' condition.

(PS - When someone wants me to not comment about their paintings, I stay at a polite distance and smile and wave because that's the level they're operating at. No slight meant or taken. Artists are a trip, including myself. :D)

screenpainter
02-24-2012, 05:11 PM
you know I love your comments and we all do. and the in depth commentaries are always greatly appreciated. and most of us can handle your helping us grow with our art as well. I suppose you are right I am a collector defending my collection. :) I love your dialogue. Don't ever stop. The forums are diminished by your absence imo, whenever that occurs. I am just disagreeing to be starting the conversation, or, in this case, continuing one we have started to have before. Basically my point can be summed up in the old saying beauty is in the eye of the beholder and sometimes on the wall of someone who paid a lot for it. :) I would agree that monetary compensation is important for the artist. I sure have seen some ridiculous stuff go for millions though. Like that guy who just does colored circles in perfect columns and rows. And then he has the chutzpah to hire a staff to paint the colors he chooses inside the circles. He doesn't even paint them anymore. He gets millions for them. yech. Yet, I think the people can vote with their eyes and hearts as well as their money. So in that respect, I can like it, you may see it as flawed. I just wouldn't want the experimenting to stop. I actually prefer the detailed comments as to why a painting doesn't work. That is really helpful to overcoming the things that fight against us. I will clear out the mailbox for sure. And we can fire up the dialog in your other wonderful thread on art as well. My point is, don't stop. I love alternate views and the artist can make a more valid decision from having the more angles and viewpoints exposed. I think its wonderful to be able to take a more negative crit and learn from them too. I am all for free speech and differing opinions. Someone has to call you to task once in awhile too my friend. :) :) :) And yes, we are... a trip.

cn-skv
02-24-2012, 07:35 PM
nice!:cool:

Mairzie Dotes
02-24-2012, 10:54 PM
gxhpainter,
"Red Barn" literally vibrates with vivid, bold colors and form. It is
as if the scene might be attempting to dance exuberantly off of
the confining canvas. The spirited energy that this piece evokes
is juicy candy for the eyes! Just love it and so well painted! :)

D Akey
02-26-2012, 08:59 PM
Originally Posted by screenpainter http://www2.ambientdesign.com/forums/images/ca_morpheus_gray/buttons/viewpost.gif (http://www2.ambientdesign.com/forums/showthread.php?p=396386#post396386)
you know I love your comments and we all do. and the in depth commentaries are always greatly appreciated.. . .

Basically my point can be summed up in the old saying beauty is in the eye of the beholder and sometimes on the wall of someone who paid a lot for it. :) I would agree that monetary compensation is important for the artist. I sure have seen some ridiculous stuff go for millions though. Like that guy who just does colored circles in perfect columns and rows. And then he has the chutzpah to hire a staff to paint the colors he chooses inside the circles. He doesn't even paint them anymore. He gets millions for them. yech. Yet, I think the people can vote with their eyes and hearts as well as their money. So in that respect, I can like it, you may see it as flawed.. . .

==========

No sweat.

Just as an asides, I wasn't trying to get you to talk in private particularly, aside from my thanking you for showing me that groovy Google search for pics feature. I prefer commenting out in the forums for the reasons mentioned. But whatever.

Not sure who the artist is you were referring to specifically, but I recognize the idea. It's not my cup of tea to look at if it's that mechanical design stuff using flat primitives like a first semester design student. However it might inspire someone. Sounds kind of Bauhaus. Everything has a context which matters greatly. I think their being at particular places in the evolution of Art adding their link to the chain makes some stuff that seems less than virtuoso, shall we say, important. We can agree I think that Art is way more than brushwork. Consciousness has a lot to do with it.

I have mentioned it before over the years, as to the money that fellow is commanding for his paintings is almost certainly the manipulations of investors to increase the worth of their collections. It's the salesmen and financiers flexing their muscles giving them bragging rights for selling something of little intrinsic worth for some exorbitant prices. I really wonder just how much is the doing of the artists themselves.

But that has nothing much to do with GXHPainter's painting here, and I apologize to him for such an extreme digression. __________________

Lima
02-29-2012, 07:23 AM
Gary, wonderful painting.

gxhpainter2
02-29-2012, 07:36 AM
Lima... thanks I really appreciate your comment..seems this stirred up quite a controversy....but all is well in the end..:):):cool::cool:

screenpainter
02-29-2012, 09:40 AM
Lima... thanks I really appreciate your comment..seems this stirred up quite a controversy....but all is well in the end..:):):cool::cool:

Forever known in the history of the old west as the red barn incident. :)
Sorry we scared most decent folk out of the city. :)