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Lima
04-26-2011, 04:59 AM
A continuous failure. It's just a puzzle. You must pass on all lines, without passing twice on the same line (or side), there are 12 lines (sides) to a single stroke see small figure.:cool:

wenkat
04-26-2011, 05:37 AM
My recent post may give you fresh direction to solve them! Good Luck!:)

Lima
04-26-2011, 06:00 AM
Wenkat, dear friend thanks. This is not a personal problem. It's just a puzzle. You must pass on all lines, without passing twice on the same line, there are 12 lines to a single stroke.:cool:

wenkat
04-26-2011, 06:11 AM
I know, but wonder whether it could be solved if it's to be in 3-D!:):)

Somewhat similar to another problem of connecting with Water, Gas and Electricity lines to three houses independently but without any crossover. A mathematics (doctorate) person told me there are some simple problems but have no conclusive answers!:)

Lima
04-26-2011, 06:16 AM
Ahh! I couldn't solve it :o

Albert
04-26-2011, 10:57 AM
A good one :)

byroncallas
04-26-2011, 01:26 PM
Hi Lima.
I question if this is possible. Below is the puzzle with all lines crossed as a first step in setting up the required condition. It appears that any configuration of connecting the lines will always leave at least one side uncrossed. If there is a solution it sure escapes me. If there is not a solution the puzzle is a false teaser. But it there is a solution, it's pretty brilliant. Do you know????:)
:):):)

Alexandra
04-26-2011, 09:15 PM
It's too early for me dear Oriane. What little brain cells I have left, have just been cooked.:p;):D

Lima
04-27-2011, 09:28 AM
:):):) to all.

Many years ago (1975) I was on duty and having lunch with a colleague when he proposed me to solve this problem. Of course I failed. Alias, I never solved it. During this entire time, occasionally I find myself drawing those lines. I like the different geometric possibilities that you can get, it is fun to do it.

Byron I guess you're right, probably it is a simple brain teaser. Your start drawing is the right rational cartesian methodical way of trying to solve it, or fail. I came to a conclusion that I do not know if is correct or not, or maybe I'm just cheating, or maybe it is my one truth about it, or maybe it just confirms my failure to solve it (see the figure).

That colleague, I never saw him again.