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View Full Version : 3D AR3 (I hope) - added explanation



byroncallas
03-01-2011, 04:08 AM
An exercise. If you blow up full screen and stand back several feet it should produce a fairly decent 3D effect. :)

edit: I posted a visual explanation below in the thread for those interested in how the relief was created.

Caesar
03-01-2011, 04:10 AM
With those grain, metallic colors and waves it gives an absolutely stunning and powerful impression of relief and tangibility! Spectacular!

Alexandra
03-01-2011, 05:14 AM
I love this Byron. It gives me a sense of security-like a comfortable blanket to crawl into for a nice nap during a calming rain.

byroncallas
03-01-2011, 11:07 AM
Sandy, Caesar - thanks you two. :):):):):):)

Suha
03-01-2011, 12:01 PM
Like smelting metals;) wonderful colors

byroncallas
03-01-2011, 04:55 PM
Suha, thanks for stopping by and commenting. Much appreciated. :)

Sketchism71
03-01-2011, 05:23 PM
Excellent 3D effect!!!! You're right, stepping back really accentuates The Bump! Interesting though, when I first looked at it - it appeared to be more of a huge indentation rather than a bump but as I allowed my mind to shift the direction of the light source it became a bump. Great texture and color as well! I wonder how much the colors used (in the bump vs. surrounding the bump) have to do with the effect? Very cool as always Byron!:cool::D:D

byroncallas
03-01-2011, 06:46 PM
Excellent 3D effect!!!! You're right, stepping back really accentuates The Bump! Interesting though, when I first looked at it - it appeared to be more of a huge indentation rather than a bump but as I allowed my mind to shift the direction of the light source it became a bump. Great texture and color as well! I wonder how much the colors used (in the bump vs. surrounding the bump) have to do with the effect? Very cool as always Byron!:cool::D:D

Eddie, you've demonstrated how a name can mess with brain. Actually, your first vision is the correct one - a, hopefully, huge indentation accentuated even more by the bump lighting effects in the "frame". Both the indentation and the frame make use of AR bump lighting effects. But each is handled in a different way combined for a visual trick that can enhance the 3d effect. I'm going to post the "trick" here later for anyone who is interested. I'm also going to change the name of the thread, as I see it can produce some confusion. I'll be back with the little demo. And thanks Eddie - a) for your always great feedback and b) for revealing the wonderful powers of bad communication. :):D:D:D:):)

Edit (a little later): Here is a brief explanation. It's not a tutorial. There are considerable steps left out. But the idea is here. The relief is developed by creating a textured image from one of the bump paints (oil brush, tube paint, glitter) and finding a section in it that you want to use to create a "super relief". I've circled the section I want to develop in image #1. Image number #2 to #4 is a process of continuing to crop the image closer and closer to the target section while increasing the dpi with each sizing and cropping. Along about image #3 and continuing with image #4 you must use the blender to clean up a host of errant pixels from the zooming and increased dpi. The increased dpi with each zoom and pixel clean-up are essential to the process. During this zooming and dpi upsizing phase the natural bump and relief from the original texture is "blown up" and cleaned up giving and appearance of a very deep relief. Actually, it's a zoom into the relief which is smoothed by up-sizing. By image #4 and carried into #5 you can start to use traditional methods with shadow and highlight to provide greater "depth". Mostly I used the airbrush and a touch of chalk. In image #5, a frame was added with the standard bump qualities from both glitter and tube paint reformed with the blur blender. This new up-bump further enhances the relief in the total image - the main reason it is added to the painting. That's it in a nutshell, but leaving out steps for the metallic and coloring effects, etc.

You could of course say "Why the hell go to all that trouble - why not just paint it this way directly?. My answer is, yes, you're probably right, it's probably a much more sensible approach. But, hey, this was just an exercise. :);):)

MacPix
03-01-2011, 09:08 PM
Wow! I feel like I could reach right into this beautiful image! Great, great effect!

byroncallas
03-01-2011, 10:41 PM
Thanks Mac. :):)

Caesar
03-01-2011, 10:47 PM
Thank You very much again, dear Byron, also for the quite clear explanation of Your brilliant and masterful procedure! Masterful because You show to know how shadows and light (thus tones) can powerfully furtherly "bump" a shape into a 3D! :)
In the past I made similar experiments, although not as much successful, but I got some depth or bas-relief effect enhanced by some chiaroscuro addition.
Here' are a sample of "bump" old ones I don't know if You already saw.
Anyway I didn't work on zoom, dpi etc., my procedure was far more rustic and required much smearing and eraser cutting ....

byroncallas
03-02-2011, 04:25 AM
Thank You very much again, dear Byron, also for the quite clear explanation of Your brilliant and masterful procedure! Masterful because You show to know how shadows and light (thus tones) can powerfully furtherly "bump" a shape into a 3D! :)
In the past I made similar experiments, although not as much successful, but I got some depth or bas-relief effect enhanced by some chiaroscuro addition.
Here' are a sample of "bump" old ones I don't know if You already saw.
Anyway I didn't work on zoom, dpi etc., my procedure was far more rustic and required much smearing and eraser cutting ....

Caesar, thanks. Beautiful pieces you've added here, I particularly like the last two for their notable aesthetic beauty. Yes, for sure normal toning with shadow and light will enhance the AR bump lighting effects quite a lot. This little zoom trick into the "bump" will enhance it even more. I suppose you have to relegate it to a trick that's mostly useful for producing paintings where the trick is mostly the point. It's a fun exercise, but not very practical for everyday projects. Probably if someone is really into 3D that much it's better to use software that's made for that purpose. Nevertheless, I found it fun to play around and see what kind of stuff like this you can squeeze out of AR3. :)

kenmo
03-02-2011, 04:55 AM
Very impressive....

Sketchism71
03-02-2011, 05:28 AM
Ahhhh... "Bump" lighting! I should have caught that but the word bump with the amazing 3D effect threw my brain for a loop! I had no idea the process was as involved as what you described... No wonder you are an AR pioneer!

It has never occurred to me to reset dpi at different intervals of the painting, doing that opens up a lot of doors especially in dealing with the slow processing of some of the tools on some of the sizes... You are the mad scientist of Artrage Dr. Callas! "Bwhaa ha ha ha!" BTW, the original source image from this is striking especially #3! Fantastic!...Now get back to the lab I can smell something burning!

Fantastic additions Caesar with some fantastic 3D effects...Beautiful!

coops
03-02-2011, 05:43 AM
Feel like i am falling down down down into such wonderful rainbow colour. Love it Byron:)

barnburner
03-02-2011, 05:45 AM
Excellent effect Byron... Thanks for sharing! :)

silvy
03-02-2011, 05:54 AM
Many thanks for sharing byron, it's very interesting:)

byroncallas
03-02-2011, 08:56 AM
Katie, Silvy, Barn, Kenmo: thanks loads. :):):)

Eddie, thanks again (and again :)). Yes, there are quite a few things you can do in AR by playing with the DPI while a painting is in progress. But you also need to be careful as changes back and forth can play havoc on some paintings, especially those with a more photo-realistic approach where some changes may not be desirable. Best to always save that backup file. The AR resizing engine also can do strange things with smoothing out texture in unwanted ways. In those cases it's better to use third-party software with better resizing engines and then import back into AR. However, additional bump "action" on material already in the image will be lost on the imported image, though it will retain the visual appearance. I find it can be all unpredictable regardless of the software. So making that back-up copy seems smart cookies. Then test away for any dpi manipulation while the painting is still in progress. When it's completed, any upsizing can be handled in third-party software with more predicable outcomes and usually great results for print production. But in the interim, going back and forth without testing might bite you. Just depends on what you want. :)