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View Full Version : Moving West-Chapt 22 - Trail of Tears



barnburner
12-31-2010, 05:03 PM
Since crossing the Mississippi, Sean, Mariska, and Dover had been traveling north for five days, when they stopped to make camp just a mile from a river settlement founded by the French, called Cape Girardeau. As Sean and Mariska set up camp, Dover rode into town to warn them that Fowler might be in this area. Just as Mariska was finishing cooking supper, Dover rode back in and dismounted.
“Ma'm, I swear I could smell your coffee all the way in town!”
Mariska laughed, poured him a cup and handed it to him as Sean asked “ Did you warn them about Fowler?”
Dover sipped his coffee and answered, “Turned out, I didn't need to. Fowler showed up in that town yesterday morning. When he walked out of the Saloon, the Mayor's wife and 4 other women were waiting with rifles, shotguns, and pistols. The Mayor's wife yelled at him just before they started the ball..said she wanted him to see that it was a bunch of women that were sending him to hell. He hadn't walked two steps out of the Saloon, when they shot him to rags.
Everybody agreed that he didn't deserve a decent burial, and they certainly were not going to have him in their town cemetary. One of the men threw him across a saddled horse, led him out into the woods, and dumped his body for the coyotes, wolves and buzzards to feed on.”
Dover grinned at Sean, and said to Mariska, “Ma'm I swear your coffee is worth it's weight in gold. If Sean here ever gets himself killed, you be sure and look me up. For a woman that makes such great coffe, and looks as good as you do, I reckon I'd make a pretty fair replacement for Ole Sean...:

Mariska smiled and winked at her husband as she said “ Mr.Dover, I'll certainly keep that in mind... it isn't everyday that a girl gets such an attractive offer.."
The day before, Sean had told Dover that he and Mariska had decided to join Dover when he turned west, instead of continuing on to St. Louis. So, after passing through Cape Girardeau, they turned west a couple of miles north of town. After a days journey, they started moving up out of the flatlands and up into the hills of southern Missouri. Soon, Sean and Mariska noticed they were seeing occasional crudely made grave markers, and in some cases, what appeared to be human bones not far off the trail. When they asked Dover about it, his answer was a shocker. “ What you are seeing here, the folks in Washington don't want people to know much about. As far back as Washington and Jefferson, our Presidents have been trying to find a way to take away the lands of the southern Indian tribes. Andy Jackson and his bunch of crooks finally stole the lands of the Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek, Cherokee, and Seminole, and forced them to move to the Oklahoma Territory under armed troops. The Choctaw were the first to be forced out in 1831, and the Cherokee, the last in 1838.
The trail we are following is one of the two routes that most of the Cherokee took. The other four tribes were marched across a more southern route. In all of these tribes, people were forced out of their homes, many of them not allowed to take more than what was on their back. Untold thousands died on these trails, from exposure to winter weather, exhaustion, sickness, and many from murders performed by our troops, so horrible in nature, that I'm ashamed to even talk about it. I was passing through here right after the last group came by, and I found a Cherokee
woman who had been left to die. She was too far gone, and there wasn't much I could do for her, but she hung on for a couple of days while she told me stories of the horrors of their trip.
I'm far from a tenderfoot, and I've seen a thing or two out here, but I have to tell you that her stories made me sick to my stomach.” Clearly disgusted, Sean asked “ How far will we travel this trail?”
“All the way to Springfield,” Dover answered. “Almost completely on the other side of Missouri. From there the tribe was marched southwest to the Oklahoma territory. We will leave the trail at Springfield. It's not a pleasant trail to travel, but it's something you need to see firsthand, so that you can pass it along to your kids, and hopefully, they will do the same. The people in Washington must not be allowed to bury their evil deed from history.”
Mariska dismounted at the next grave marker, and examined the ground around it. “Mr. Dover, I cannot help but think about how easily it could have been my people on this trail.
I know we need to see the evidence of what happened on this trail, but, the sooner that's done, the better I will sleep.”
“Sean, I'm sure you will agree with me on this - let's rise early, ride hard, and camp late, so that we can get this done as quickly as possible.”
All three of them agreed, and they proceeded
down the trail with that in mind.
--------
Done totally with AR2.5, used all the tools except the spray, and the roller.
Lots and lots and lots and lots of layers... :)

eighty+
12-31-2010, 06:36 PM
I'still riding the trail. BB

barnburner
01-01-2011, 01:52 AM
I'still riding the trail. BB

Glad to have you along sir... Much appreciated. :)

Mairzie Dotes
01-02-2011, 09:46 PM
barnburner,
As they proceeded to travel along the trail of tears, Mariska could not
help but notice the tall stately trees as they seemed to stand as silent
witnesses to the sad occurrence and as spirit earth's sentry's, their
protective branches, as if in solemn prayer, tenderly reached out and
over the graves in an embracing jester of homage, as if being paid to
those souls who, even from their graves, continue to whisper the story
of their tragic fate. :(

Those elequently painted trees were my inspiration to add an additional
paragraph to this most touching story. So poignantly related and well
painted! :)

screenpainter
01-03-2011, 05:42 AM
Love the forest illustration for this. Well done on all accounts.

barnburner
01-03-2011, 11:45 AM
barnburner,
As they proceeded to travel along the trail of tears, Mariska could not
help but notice the tall stately trees as they seemed to stand as silent
witnesses to the sad occurrence and as spirit earth's sentry's, their
protective branches, as if in solemn prayer, tenderly reached out and
over the graves in an embracing jester of homage, as if being paid to
those souls who, even from their graves, continue to whisper the story
of their tragic fate. :(

Those elequently painted trees were my inspiration to add an additional
paragraph to this most touching story. So poignantly related and well
painted! :)


Mary Ann, thank you so much for that heartfelt and eloquent addition to the chapter...
Those trees are the kind of trees that dominate the area I have written about in this chapter. I've been through this country many times, so getting the geography right as far as describing it was fairly simple. Painting it, not so simple.. :D
Thanks again. :):)

barnburner
01-03-2011, 11:50 AM
Love the forest illustration for this. Well done on all accounts.

Many thanks kind sir... It was quite time consuming, but I'm pretty happy with how it turned out. My mother and step-father lived very near one of the trails the Cherokee were forced to march over in southeastern Missouri. Altho I didn't intend for it to
end up that way, this setting is very similar to the country just down the road from where my Mother lived.:)

Alexandra
01-03-2011, 03:46 PM
Great job dear friend.

waheednasir
01-03-2011, 08:17 PM
yes, very well done..:).

barnburner
01-04-2011, 01:06 AM
Great job dear friend.

Thank you so much Sandra.. I appreciate your support very much my friend. :)

barnburner
01-04-2011, 01:07 AM
yes, very well done..:).

Thank you very much. Truly appreciated! :)

coops
01-04-2011, 03:48 AM
Happy New Year Barnburner and wow what a great episode and brilliant painting. Well done:)

barnburner
01-04-2011, 04:09 AM
Happy New Year Barnburner and wow what a great episode and brilliant painting. Well done:)

A Happy New year to you Coops. Thank you very much for your kind comments. I truly appreciate it. :)

mannafig
01-04-2011, 12:02 PM
Another fantastic addition Barn:):)

barnburner
01-04-2011, 03:53 PM
Another fantastic addition Barn:):)

Thank you so much Amanda.. I appreciate that very much... :)

javier
01-04-2011, 11:35 PM
Great work dear friend.

barnburner
01-05-2011, 12:52 AM
Great work dear friend.

Javier, thanks so much. I appreciate that. :)

Caesar
01-05-2011, 10:45 AM
Apart from the fact that Dover's passion for the coffee got him sensibly and openly turned on and cheeky :rolleyes: ... the story the trail narrates is so sad that it would be unbelievable to anyone not old and informed enough and knowingly aware of how too many evil human beings and systems appeared in history anywhere and anytime. No place or people was made apparently immune by progress or civilization from the mistakes and the crimes of the past.
The illustration here here the most eloquent.
No mythological superiority seems to survive to facts, as it is better than ever shown in these days by the coward and terrible slaughters against religious minorities occurring in these years and, in particular, in these holidays period, in Pakistan, Iraq, India and Egypt and too many more, often in places, civilizations and nations with the illusion to be divinely inspired and religiously most tolerant by legends where colonialism, intolerance, crusades, inquisitions etc. are narrated to pertain only to other specific places and people. Cultures which became supremacy ideologies which can be hardly considered theologies, especially whenever God is believed to need believers much human violence to establish His Will.

barnburner
01-05-2011, 01:03 PM
Apart from the fact that Dover's passion for the coffee got him sensibly and openly turned on and cheeky :rolleyes: ... the story the trail narrates is so sad that it would be unbelievable to anyone not old and informed enough and knowingly aware of how too many evil human beings and systems appeared in history anywhere and anytime. No place or people was made apparently immune by progress or civilization from the mistakes and the crimes of the past.
The illustration here here the most eloquent.
No mythological superiority seems to survive to facts, as it is better than ever shown in these days by the coward and terrible slaughters against religious minorities occurring in these years and, in particular, in these holidays period, in Pakistan, Iraq, India and Egypt and too many more, often in places, civilizations and nations with the illusion to be divinely inspired and religiously most tolerant by legends where colonialism, intolerance, crusades, inquisitions etc. are narrated to pertain only to other specific places and people. Cultures which became supremacy ideologies which can be hardly considered theologies, especially whenever God is believed to need believers much human violence to establish His Will.

It is indeed sad that so much of this type of horrific behavior has taken place around the world, for as long as time has been recorded.
Thanks Caesar..:)

pat1940
01-06-2011, 06:29 AM
Barney, so very well done, you have worked diligently on your story and the paintings that relate to the story, what talent you have, be proud my friend, as this is quite a journey for all of us .....thankyou:):):);););)

barnburner
01-06-2011, 07:22 AM
Barney, so very well done, you have worked diligently on your story and the paintings that relate to the story, what talent you have, be proud my friend, as this is quite a journey for all of us .....thankyou:):):);););)

Wow.... Pat, I am rather speechless after reading your wonderful comment. I think you are being over-generous, but, I'LL TAKE IT! :D:D
Thank you so much. I sincerely appreciate it. :):)

AT-TA
01-06-2011, 10:33 AM
Barney this is a gorgeous picture of the forest... love that orangey ground, goes nicely with the green tops.
It was a really sad time for indians to live at... i remember my favored poet, he traveled and then worked at the States as a teacher.at the beginning of twentiest century.. and he later wrote about this occurences... he couldn't stand it and returned home into a wonderfully prosperous and wonderfull times... he just couldn't forget those poor Indians...Very good job Barney!

barnburner
01-06-2011, 11:24 AM
Barney this is a gorgeous picture of the forest... love that orangey ground, goes nicely with the green tops.
It was a really sad time for indians to live at... i remember my favored poet, he traveled and then worked at the States as a teacher.at the beginning of twentiest century.. and he later wrote about this occurences... he couldn't stand it and returned home into a wonderfully prosperous and wonderfull times... he just couldn't forget those poor Indians...Very good job Barney!

I suppose I'm another that just can't forget the many injustices our government inflicted upon so many Native Americans. Many years ago, I had a Navajo young man in my platoon. I was able to talk to him several times about his life on the reservation, and his description of their life there was to say the least - depressing.
Thank you for the very kind comment AT. Much appreciated! :)