PDA

View Full Version : Hello, another newbie!



yolojo
12-07-2010, 08:33 PM
Hello everyone here on ArtRage.

I've been a long time Photoshop User but a first time ArtRage user (no traditional painting background). I'm trying out ArtRage to get oilpainting effects that are similar to James Jean's style. I'm trying to figure things out but I'm having a tough time doing it.

Any tips?

I'd actually love to post what I'm working on, however this is my first post on the forum and I'm not allowed to link pictures :(. I've seen a couple ArtRage tutorials but none of them actually teaches me how to paint properly (they all seem to assume you know how to paint on a traditional canvas already).

PS: Does anyone know how many posts I need to make until I can post my work? Because I'm dying to get help with it since its actually for my portfolio...

hanzz
12-07-2010, 09:24 PM
type the adress below. we can paste it in our browser, or one of us can make an actual link if it's an OK link. The ability(or the lack of it) to post links has to do with the spamposters spoiling the forum before.....

but I think you can have attachments with your posts.

barnburner
12-08-2010, 04:15 AM
As Hanzz said, unless things have changed, you can post your work as an attachment to your post.
Just go down to "manage attachments", browse and upload your saved file.

Welcome to the forum. I know what it's like to come here with no painting background. When I found ArtRage 3 years ago, I had never painted anything, other a house or fence with a paintbrush and a bucket of paint.. :D There is an endless amount of advice, instruction, and support available here between the tutorials, and the helpful posters.
Have you looked at the ArtRage manual yet? It contains very good instructions for how to use all the tools in AR.
My suggestion for what it's worth, would be to take time to learn how to paint using layers. It really helps when you are starting out, enabling you to correct one thing, without screwing up the rest of the painting.
Down the road you will find dozens of other advantages to the layer system, but, one step at a time.
Best advice I can offer to start, is to experiment with all the different tools, different settings,etc. to get an idea of what they do, and what kind of look they offer.
Main thing is - don't feel overwhelmed. This forum is a great support system, filled with a lot of people eager to help. Feel free to ask questions.
:)

Someonesane
12-08-2010, 06:29 AM
Hi Yolojo, and welcome to the ArtRage Forums.

I think it's important to remember that even though ArtRage (and other programs) try to come close to a natural style and appearance, there will always be some sort of a difference between how the true media behaves, and how the digital media behaves. That being said, here are few tips that I personally enjoy using (you didn't say which version of ArtRage you're using, so I'll assume you're going to use the Studio Pro version, which offers the most options):

50912

yolojo
12-08-2010, 10:16 AM
Thank you all for welcoming me.

I feel like an idiot now, I actually figured out about the attachment thing and I posted in the Work in Progress section. I'll post it here again. The drawing on top is what I'm working on, titled Palm Gentleman. While the second attachment is an example of the effect I'm trying to achieve with Art Rage, done by James Jean.

Thank you Someonesane for that mini-tutorial, I'm using Artrage Studio 3, not the pro version. So I guess I'm missing out on some stuff. I haven't tried your technique yet but I tried mixing with a palette knife and I find that really hard. The colors look pretty but they don't follow the path that I want them to, especially on the face of the girl. When I don't use wet paint it gets worse :(. Currently I've deleted all the color and outlining the whole thing with pencils to redefine the features.

PS: I just did a google and downloaded the PDF that explains the difference between Studio and Studio Pro. Am I missing something? So the Oil Paint physics is actually different in the Pro version? Is it still possible for me to attain the "soft-dry-look" that James Jean did?

Someonesane
12-08-2010, 11:02 AM
Thank you Someonesane for that mini-tutorial, I'm using Artrage Studio 3, not the pro version. So I guess I'm missing out on some stuff. I haven't tried your technique yet but I tried mixing with a palette knife and I find that really hard. The colors look pretty but they don't follow the path that I want them to, especially on the face of the girl. When I don't use wet paint it gets worse :(. Currently I've deleted all the color and outlining the whole thing with pencils to redefine the features.

PS: I just did a google and downloaded the PDF that explains the difference between Studio and Studio Pro. Am I missing something? So the Oil Paint physics is actually different in the Pro version? Is it still possible for me to attain the "soft-dry-look" that James Jean did?


Hello again,

You'll be able to do everything I've mentioned with the regular Studio version. The Oil Brush works the same way in both versions.

I think, it's just going to take some practice, like most things do. You'll pick up little tricks as you work with the program, that give you look you're trying to get. My style doesn't really match Jeans, but I think the techniques could be useful for getting there. The tips I posted above were used to create the following few images below (click on the first two to see larger versions):

http://www2.ambientdesign.com/gallery/files/3/3/4/2/christian_done_thumb.jpg (http://www2.ambientdesign.com/gallery/showimage.php?i=12516&c=member&imageuser=3342) http://www2.ambientdesign.com/gallery/files/3/3/4/2/evilmrweevil_thumb.jpg (http://www2.ambientdesign.com/gallery/showimage.php?i=8229&c=member&imageuser=3342)
http://www2.ambientdesign.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=28128&d=1243177823


Aside from the grain in the Evil Mr Weevil image, they were created mostly with only my Oil Brush presets. I may have used some Palette Knife here or there, but mostly I used a thinned out Oil Brush for the blending (with and without insta dry on, at times).

In trying to get closer to Jeans work, you might want to include some watercolor tool in there, because it looks like some liquid-like washes were used in your example image, which the tool might help create.

Here are some thread you can browse through, that may have some other tips you might use:

http://www2.ambientdesign.com/forums/showthread.php?t=31468

http://www2.ambientdesign.com/forums/showthread.php?t=19595

http://www2.ambientdesign.com/forums/showthread.php?t=28755

http://www2.ambientdesign.com/forums/showthread.php?t=30860

http://www2.ambientdesign.com/forums/showthread.php?t=31056

Someonesane
12-08-2010, 12:11 PM
As I mentioned, my style is a bit different from James Jean, so I have to force myself to work in that manner, but I did give it shot. Unfortunately, I don't have the time to complete the study at the moment, but here's where I am so far (about 30 to 40 minutes in). I think with some practice, it would be possible to come fairly close to the style.


http://www2.ambientdesign.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=50920&stc=1&d=129175291350922

yolojo
12-08-2010, 07:52 PM
Someonesane, those look absolutely wonderful. That baby is so cute.

I haven't read through all the tutorials you posted yet because the sun had just risen on my side of the world. But I am amazed by the experiment you did in your second post. Is that water color? Or thinned out oil?

After I finish outlining my entire piece, I'll give it another shot.

Someonesane
12-08-2010, 08:00 PM
Hi Yolojo, Thanks :D

For the most part, what I have there was done with a thinned Oil Brush tool. I did use some Palette knife blending (Wet version) here and there, and I did do some color washes on the upper right with the water color tool (but it was minimal in comparison to the amount of Oil Brush used). Time granting, I'll do some more work on it soon.

Someonesane
12-09-2010, 07:57 AM
I finished my reproduction study of the James Jean image you shared. I posted it below, along with some detail shots. Again, I used the Oil Brush tool, set to use high thinners to create the majority of what you see. The only real deviations from this is the girls hair, where I used the Crayon on the Smooth (0% Roughness) layer texture, and the upper right corner where I used some Water Color brush to add in some watery drifting marks.


50969

50961 50964

50962 50963

yolojo
12-09-2010, 10:48 AM
Wow that looks absolutely brilliant, I was trying out the technique that you mentioned in one of your links.

The "Blending Effeciently With Oils" one. I usually paint in Photoshop, and I've been using a similar technique, but they always end up looking very flat or "photoshoppy" (which is why I'm trying out ArtRage). When you say thin oils I'm assuming you used the same technique (in the video) on the James Jean study?

I would've never dreamt of using Crayons since I didn't touch those in eons.

I think one of my major problems right now is that I can't settle down with the right colors to get the same effect (on my own piece), even if I can paint.

Thank you so much for taking time out of your own to help me out.

I'm going to try it out and show you how it goes.

Someonesane
12-09-2010, 11:32 AM
Wow that looks absolutely brilliant, I was trying out the technique that you mentioned in one of your links.

The "Blending Effeciently With Oils" one. I usually paint in Photoshop, and I've been using a similar technique, but they always end up looking very flat or "photoshoppy" (which is why I'm trying out ArtRage). When you say thin oils I'm assuming you used the same technique (in the video) on the James Jean study?



Yes, that is what I did here. I may have increased or decreased the amount of thinning involved, depending on the area I was working on, but for the most part I used my saved presets. I've attached the Oil Brush presets I used for the blending, in case you'd like to try them out (see below on how to import them into artrage). They're both the same, really, except one uses the round brush head and the other uses the square (though, I do find they both have unique, and useful traits in terms of shapes they create when working them into the canvas).

50974
50975

Steps to import the attached Oil Brush presets (.prs files):

1 - Save the .prs files to your computer
2 - Open ArtRage
3 - Select the Oil Brush tool
4 - With the Oil Brush tool selected, click on the Presets Pod to open the Presets Panel.
4 - Click the Menu tab (square with four horizontal lines) on the Presets panel, and select "Import Preset To Collection".




Thank you so much for taking time out of your own to help me out.

I'm going to try it out and show you how it goes.



No problem :). I look forward to seeing your completed image.