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Canvasian
12-23-2009, 04:04 PM
I'm not sure what they're called... figure frames or wire frames I think... but I'm looking for tutorials on how to pre-sketch a figure (specifically a human figure)... you know, the stick figures with guidelines on the face for facial features and circles where the joints and hands / feet are? I know of a book I can get at my Library (a Marvel How To Draw Comics book) that has a great tutorial on this, but I'm not sure how long it will be before I can get back up there, as we recently got 21 inches of snow and I'm still waiting for it to melt (and not refreeze as ice!) So I guess my question for now is,

1.) What are the things called?

2.) Any tutorials around? Either here on the forums or elsewhere on the internet?

Right now when I paint / draw I can't paint any position / pose or point of view that I don't have a photo reference of. I started awhile back learning about the wire frames from the Marvel book I mentioned earlier, and I think I could draw a larger variety of figures more easily and without references if I could learn to use them again.

Thanks! :)

Judith Tramayne
12-23-2009, 04:15 PM
In Bing, I put "how to draw figures" and came up with loads of sites

For instance:

http://drawsketch.about.com/od/figuredrawing/Figure_Drawing_Life_Drawing_Tips_and_Lessons.htm

and

http://drawsketch.about.com/gi/o.htm?zi=1/XJ/Ya&zTi=1&sdn=drawsketch&cdn=hobbies&tm=19&gps=183_1002_1004_610&f=00&tt=14&bt=1&bts=0&zu=http%3A//www.art.net/%7Erebecca/LifeDrawing1.html

Anything you want to know is in the Search Engines :)

Judith

Someonesane
12-23-2009, 06:16 PM
1.) What are the things called?

I figure the term you're looking for is "gesture drawing", which is the term I see most often used to describe a quick sketch of a figure. "How to draw Comics the Marvel Way" was one of my first How To books, btw (and I still have it :cool:).




2.) Any tutorials around? Either here on the forums or elsewhere on the internet?


Some quick online searches should bring up some results, but when it comes down to drawing from memory alone, it's really a matter of having studied (extensively) whatever it is one plans to draw. The gesture sketch itself will help, but it can't replace proper anatomical knowledge. When working from references in the future, try to take metal notes of how certain muscles flex or bend, so when you plan to draw a pose similar to it in the future you'll have an idea to work off of.

arenhaus
12-24-2009, 03:19 AM
Andrew Loomis is unmatched so far in terms of figure drawing textbooks. Five books are available for download at fineart.sk.

In order of skill advancement: "Fun with a Pencil", "Successful Drawing", "Figure Drawing for All It's Worth" and "Drawing Face and Hands", "Creative Illustration".

Enjoy.

Also: "Bodies and Anatomy" from the How to Draw Manga series, and Tiner's "Figure Drawing Without a Model". You'll have to buy those, however.

bebraw
12-24-2009, 09:17 PM
If you happen to be more of a visual guy and prefer videos, check out the series of Riven Phoenix (http://www.youtube.com/user/RivenPhoenix). I have found his series excellent.

He starts out with basics and introduces the basic 8 head model of proportions (okay it's not realistic but good enough I guess :) ). His approach is strongly based on observations of anatomy (bones, muscles). This gives you a solid framework based on which to build your character design.

Additionally you might find Artnatomy (http://www.artnatomia.net/uk/artnatomyProgram.html) tool interesting. It gives you some insight to how the muscles of the head work to form different expressions.

arenhaus
12-24-2009, 09:44 PM
bebraw - Riven Phoenix is overrated. I've watched some of his videos, and they had been a disappointment. His approach is formulaic; he copies photos and uses stiff, fixed angles when drawing from memory. He memorized the anatomy structures, but he seems to have little systematic understanding of them. He isn't a very good teacher - in one video, he announced that he was going to explain the muscles of the leg, and then spent over two thirds of the time drawing the bones, skimming over the muscles while trying to squeeze them all in the last third. Worst of all, he was vague on where the tendons actually go, and then (I couldn't believe my eyes) he stuck a nonexistent muscle in. I stopped watching at that point.

Oh, and don't ever hold the pencil like he does. His dirty, chaotic line is largely due to his writing-pen grip while drawing.

I don't second your recommendation. Phoenix is somewhat popular largely because of marketing on Youtube, not because he is anything special or useful.

Stick to Tiner, Loomis, Ellenberger, Simblet... Bridgman can be good if you are after a more comic-book anatomy and can parse his idiosyncratic drawing style. The Virtual Pose series is good for reference if you already have some knowledge of anatomy, because you can see the volume much clearer in a rotation than in a single photo. Avoid Poser, it is useless.

Canvasian
12-24-2009, 10:06 PM
Wow, thanks everyone! :) drawsketch.about.com is actually where I did my first serious drawing tutorials... even before I took any art classes back in high school :) it's a great one... I'll have to check back on it though, I haven't been back in a couple years. How To Draw Comics the Marvel Way IS the name of the one I borrowed from my library a few weeks (or months? I'm not even sure) ago... (thanks for reminding me of the name :D) it was great :) I might buy it eventually. I've never heard of those other suggestions though, I'll check them out... especially those e-books. Thanks again :D

bebraw
12-24-2009, 10:10 PM
bebraw - Riven Phoenix is overrated. I've watched some of his videos, and they had been a disappointment. His approach is formulaic; he copies photos and uses stiff, fixed angles when drawing from memory. He memorized the anatomy structures, but he seems to have little systematic understanding of them. He isn't a very good teacher - in one video, he announced that he was going to explain the muscles of the leg, and then spent over two thirds of the time drawing the bones, skimming over the muscles while trying to squeeze them all in the last third. Worst of all, he was vague on where the tendons actually go, and then (I couldn't believe my eyes) he stuck a nonexistent muscle in. I stopped watching at that point.

Good point! I never got that far in his videos. I mainly went through the beginning and got the idea that one should adopt a formulaic approach when drawing people. I suppose I will stick to Loomis for now. Thanks for your astute observation. :)

I forgot to mention Bobby Chiu (http://www.youtube.com/user/digitalbobert). If you are into that kind of style, you might find his videos entertaining. Check out also http://tenminutedrawing.blogspot.com/ and http://gurneyjourney.blogspot.com/ for various techniques.

Senkusha
09-07-2010, 05:41 AM
...

Oh, and don't ever hold the pencil like he does. His dirty, chaotic line is largely due to his writing-pen grip while drawing.

...


I'm just curious, how do all you "professional" artist ;) hold the pencil? Perhaps I suffer from this same issue with my line art.

RegnR8
09-07-2010, 07:55 AM
http://www.posemaniacs.com/

I go there to get a few ideas and the 30 second drawing training prog is great for getting a quick figure down under a set time limit.

GenghisShawn
09-07-2010, 09:04 AM
Oh, and don't ever hold the pencil like he does. His dirty, chaotic line is largely due to his writing-pen grip while drawing.



I always thought you did what was comfortable to you?

Someonesane
09-07-2010, 10:41 AM
I always thought you did what was comfortable to you?


That's what I do. Sometimes I hold it like I'm going to write a letter, other times I'll hold it under my palm (see image below). It's just a matter of what I'm drawing or how I feel like doing it.

48033

arenhaus
09-09-2010, 09:35 PM
http://chiseledrocks.com/main/musings/topics/how_to_hold_the_pencil

:)

Senkusha
09-10-2010, 01:11 AM
Thank you! That article answered a lot of questions I had, one of them being why Wacom decided upon putting the "right click" button up so high on the pen shaft!

I'll try using these techniques and see if my drawings improve. I'm thinking optimistically that it will. :)

tasquith
10-12-2010, 08:12 AM
I figure the term you're looking for is "gesture drawing", which is the term I see most often used to describe a quick sketch of a figure. "How to draw Comics the Marvel Way" was one of my first How To books, btw (and I still have it :cool:).





Some quick online searches should bring up some results, but when it comes down to drawing from memory alone, it's really a matter of having studied (extensively) whatever it is one plans to draw. The gesture sketch itself will help, but it can't replace proper anatomical knowledge. When working from references in the future, try to take metal notes of how certain muscles flex or bend, so when you plan to draw a pose similar to it in the future you'll have an idea to work off of.

I'll second "How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way" -- my old copy was well-used for about 20+ years and I finally replaced it last year.

As for tutorials, you can find quite a few on the 'Net. (Elfwood, Deviantart and About.com all have large numbers of tutorials. Also some of the illustration magazines have online versions -- for example, ImagineFX -- and their tutorials are definitely worth looking at.) But I'd suggest that real-life studies and statue/figuring study are definitely the way to go.

GekkouJin
10-12-2010, 11:41 AM
Thnx RegnR8 for sharing the link http://www.posemaniacs.com/
Great site. Not easy the 30 sec. drawing!

vapsman88
10-14-2010, 09:50 PM
Check out Michael Hampton:
http://www.figuredrawing.info/gesture.html

He has a great book out as well "Figure Drawing Design and Invention". The book covers all parts of drawing the figure with a process-oriented approach. Topics include gesture, figure construction, head drawing, anatomy, and more.
http://www.amazon.com/Figure-Drawing-Invention-Michael-Hampton/dp/0615272819/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1262299000&sr=8-1

~John