PDA

View Full Version : i want critique please



okasa
09-07-2009, 06:42 AM
hi everyone. I got a bamboo one and with it came artrage. Played around and traced some from the start. Now i made my owne manga picture, but i want critic. There are no hands ( cant draw them ) and the feet look terrible.:p

arenhaus
09-07-2009, 08:51 AM
Go to the address fineart.sk, where you'll find the textbooks by Andrew Loomis. Buy a box of pencils and a pack of printer paper, and practice with Loomis for six months. Don't touch the computer yet and don't ever try to imitate any anime before you are through. ;)

Good luck! :D

Someonesane
09-07-2009, 09:58 AM
I'll agree with arenhaus on seeking out some good books on figure drawing and human anatomy, though I wouldn't say one has to forget about using a tablet altogether while one is learning. I understand the reasoning behind telling someone to start with pencil and paper, but I really don't see any reason one cannot go back and forth between the two while learning anatomy, dynamic lighting, etc. The main issues would likely be the over use of the "undo" feature or "cut and pasting" to fix areas (which one won't find in traditional methods). Though, to change a mistake, one would first need to recognize the mistake. As such, being able to easily and quickly change a mistake can help alleviate some frustrations that may inhibit the learning process.

I also don't completely agree that one has to forget about attempting to draw in the style of art that is attracting a person to drawing in the first place. While learning proper proportions is key to good figure drawing and manipulation of such figures, the whole process will only help if that person stays interested. This is all just my opinion, of course.

screenpainter
09-07-2009, 09:59 AM
I think you are off to a good start! The larger picture is really a lot easier to see. I thought you did great on the eyes and the hair.

Keep in mind that the lines you use to define shapes should have smooth edges. They can vary somewhat in width like in calligraphy but still you have to keep a smooth edge.

For this type of are it is important to have a sketchbook and to draw constantly. That is how you will get better and better at it. I am amazed at how much knowledge of the human figure and anatomy manga artists have.
Keep going you will do great work. The quality of line in manga is the most important element.

I have often thought about having some stencils in artrage for manga eyes. I just never get around to it. Have fun drawing. Hope to see more and more.

okasa
09-07-2009, 11:44 PM
I'm glad for the tips and the critique. I have used pen and paper before, but stopped painting for several years. Started over again now and I made several pictures using the tracing technique on artrage.

I read that it was a god way of learning to draw, to trace, and practice, and practice. this is one picture I traced and im happpy with how it came out. ( its edward elric from full metal alchemist )
will continue practicing, more will come

Someonesane
09-08-2009, 02:38 AM
I read that it was a god way of learning to draw, to trace, and practice, and practice. this is one picture I traced and im happpy with how it came out. ( its edward elric from full metal alchemist )
will continue practicing, more will come

Ah... Full Metal alchemist. Good anime.

Tracing is sort of a double edged sword, though. It can help if one is determined to concentrate on why the image they are tracing works as a whole. Taking note of why a certain shadow is used to define a specific area, for example. Many times one will find an image where the person tried to define the nose with a simple triangle shadow. The idea here is sound in some cases, but often something about it misses the mark (be it position or shape). Usually, when it doesn't seem right, it's because the person hadn't thought about why they were putting a triangle shadow there. In cases like this, it's normally because the person recalled, from tracing other images, that many of them had a triangle shadow there. They did not stop to think of the form present in that area, which would cast this triangular shaped shadow, which is the nose. If one is just tracing for the sake of creating a good image, the point of learning from it can be lost. So be sure, while you are tracing, that you are attempting to understand why the particular artist has done something in his/her work to define a particular form. While you're at it, try to spot areas in the their work that might be "wrong" when looking at it from anatomically correct point of view.

Raybrite
09-08-2009, 10:02 AM
Why not just search the web for "drawing hands tutorials" and choose one of the free tutorials found there.
The key is practice, practice, practice. With a tablet and pen on eh computer you will not even have to pay for supplies as they are free too.
Have fun and welcome.:):):):):)

okasa
09-08-2009, 08:52 PM
Ah... Full Metal alchemist. Good anime.

Tracing is sort of a double edged sword, though. It can help if one is determined to concentrate on why the image they are tracing works as a whole. Taking note of why a certain shadow is used to define a specific area, for example. Many times one will find an image where the person tried to define the nose with a simple triangle shadow. The idea here is sound in some cases, but often something about it misses the mark (be it position or shape). Usually, when it doesn't seem right, it's because the person hadn't thought about why they were putting a triangle shadow there. In cases like this, it's normally because the person recalled, from tracing other images, that many of them had a triangle shadow there. They did not stop to think of the form present in that area, which would cast this triangular shaped shadow, which is the nose. If one is just tracing for the sake of creating a good image, the point of learning from it can be lost. So be sure, while you are tracing, that you are attempting to understand why the particular artist has done something in his/her work to define a particular form. While you're at it, try to spot areas in the their work that might be "wrong" when looking at it from anatomically correct point of view.


That was sort of my thought. I really tried to se where the shadows are and how they loked depending on where the lightsource came from. And i think it was a god picture to trace to get a feel for the anatomi. ( and of course edward is so cute ! haha ) i really like that anime.

arenhaus
09-09-2009, 05:30 AM
Yes, tracing isn't a good way to learn useful drawing skills. You'll learn to trace, and your hand will be steadier. You won't learn anything else, really. Not how the picture was constructed, not why it was composed this way, nothing.

Tracing the cel art, like anime or traditional animation, is especially treacherous. Its clean contour line does not show anything about the volume and the underlying logic of the drawing. The main work of the artist is not in the contour; it's in the preparation of the sketch, the underlying understanding of volume and anatomy and perspective.

If you're experienced enough, you can discern all these things from the finished drawing by another artist, and so glean some insight; but at that level you don't need to trace other people's drawings anyway.