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Jules
10-21-2006, 10:31 AM
Who finds it hard creating images from the imagination? I do, I just sit and stare at a blank screen of paper for hours lol. I can't seem to work unless I have some reference image in-front of me, I would love to able to create something like you cool guys on here. I have done a couple of works (checkout my blog at the bottom) but they are very few and far between.
:? :D

justG
10-21-2006, 12:11 PM
Oh, I do. Nearly impossible, actually. :\

maror
10-21-2006, 01:16 PM
hmmm no i don't
in some times maybe....there's still nothing! But then i draw only abit around and i nearly every chase there are some shapes and colors wich gives me an idea...give it a try!

greez

Jules
10-21-2006, 01:52 PM
Sometimes I just sit an doodle and something forms, but more often than not I discard the picture.

Aged P
10-21-2006, 02:35 PM
I almost never use a reference image or a tracing.
Grains I use quite a lot, until we get some different brushes! :lol:

If it doesn't exist up in, what's left of, my brain it doesn't get painted.
I sometimes get inspiration from another picture or event, but I seldom use stuff that isn't already pretty clear in my mind.

Blank paper , real or virtual, doesn't last long in front of me, there's always something to create on it, even if it gets scrapped eventually. It's all practice.

Phil

sbug51
10-21-2006, 03:03 PM
well i usually imagine myself being that specfic creature i want, this way i can imagine my moves and i can be able to translate them into paper, but on specific type of imagination or concept of a creature person etc, it depepnds on what i need, like robots, i have lots of mental images crossing my mind as i say it, as well as biological creatures, but when it comes on creating a human female body i need a reference!

yeah just felt like sharing that

cheers!

Jules
10-21-2006, 03:10 PM
yeh Aged P thats great, wish I could. I wanted to be an illustrator when I grew up lol, but unfortunatley inspiration doesnt come to me quickly, I am good at rendering an image but lack creativity, that let me down at art college.

sbug51 I know what you mean about reference images for the human body, although some people can draw figures without references, im not one of them.

Jules
10-21-2006, 03:12 PM
ok a random thought, who can draw a horse from memory :shock: :lol:

D Akey
10-21-2006, 08:51 PM
People who are good at realistic styles out of their head have been doing similar things for a while. At some early point in getting to where they could do it out of their head, they had visual reference to learn the structure and surface. And they did it a lot thereafter. I'll reference Waheed, who is amazing. But he's practiced.

In studios, when styles would change as for a different show style, it was rare that these seasoned professionals had it down right off the bat, and never all of them. There was a bit of a learning curve.

Either one is very gifted with a photographic memory, or has to go through the steps to hit and maintain a plateau upon which they can build.

I've found that it slows progress to bounce around before re-enforcing what you just tried for the first time. That's a choice. Some people like to bounce. But there often is a price to pay if at some point you don't stay with something long enough to get good at it.

Believe me, if you drew horses a lot, you would be able to do them out of your head. And the people who say they're no good at drawing horses have avoided doing them and perhaps even set up a mental block.

Develop enough mental blocks and you'll find yourself walled in.

My suggestion, if you have the luxury, is to do stuff you love. That way you will be more likely to keep doing it and create a solid foundation for any new thing you try thereafter.

Then when you wanted to do a horse standing, you could. And roll that over to do perhaps a horse cantering. Then a horse running, then jumping. And then, if in your creativity, you wanted to do a horse in a field, or a desert or floating in the sky, you could do it.

Imagination gets liberated when you no longer have to worry about the exact photo reference. And the paintings will be more satisfying if they look decent. And then you would want to do it more. etc. . .

Sethren
10-22-2006, 04:50 AM
Yes and no, sometimes i can look at anything and transform it in my mind. I think my childhood never left me. :roll:

I think when i have a headace or i am sick i tend to do better at directly drawing from my head.

royblumenthal
10-22-2006, 10:22 PM
Hiya Jules...

I work mostly from reference... either a person sitting in a coffee shop I happen to be in, or a photo of a person.

But I also work from imagination with no reference at all sometimes.

I would suggest that there are a few tricks that you might want to add to your gadget-bag.

1. Throw nothing away. You mentioned that you sometimes doodle, but end up discarding most of those. No!!!! Don't do it! The critical, judging part of your brain is NOT your best friend hot on the heels of creation! You need to accept that what you've doodled MIGHT or might NOT be worth something, and that you will make that judgement MUCH MUCH later.

2. In a proggie like ArtRage, you've got incredibly expressive and non-standard ways of doodling that MIGHT set you off on making something delightful. One way I like to start my imagination sketches is to squeeze out a bit of paint in varying colours on the bottom layer, and then roll over them with the roller tool, and then slice into them with the pallet knife. After a while, stuff emerges. But it only emerges if I'm on the lookout for it. If I'm sitting there accusing myself of doodling, then all I can see is rubbish. You've gotta frame your artmaking experience in a positive light, else you'll only see the negative.

3. Sign up for Illustartion Friday's topic of the week, and let that be the 'spark' that gives you an idea for a pic. http://www.illustrationfriday.com.

4. Take a reference pic, and draw the opposite. Or fixate on something unimportant in the reference pic, and exaggerate it. Make that the subject of your pic.

5. Look into doing palimpsest work. Make cruddy doodles on one layer, and then completely over-paint them in a top layer. But let the top layer be slightly transparent, so that some of the earlier work shines through. Then see how those things interact, and they might suggest yet another layer on top of both of them.

The idea with all of my suggestions is really for you to take the pressure off yourself. You're NOT required to make a brilliant, saleable artwork when you're working from your imagination. You need to have fun with it. Or have misery. Whatever your need is from art, that's what you've gotta liberate. There are no shoulds.

Lastly, there's nothing wrong with working from reference. Without reference, how would you ever learn anything? Just cos you used a reference pic doesn't mean it's 'non-art'. And just cos something came out of your imagination doesn't make it 'art'.

Blue skies
love
Roy

ENCHANTER
10-22-2006, 10:44 PM
m one of those who need areference, even fr imagnative paintings, i cannot draw or paint as good without areference..but it could be that i dont practice enough art so i can just put down on paper(virtual or otherwise) stuff frm my memory ! :D

Jules
10-22-2006, 11:19 PM
Hi royblumenthal, from now on I'm not going to throw any work away, you're quite right in what you say. I've found using the tube and scraper tool, I'm getting some interesting effects that are sparking off my imagination, my right brain has been in some basement gathering dust lol, I've swept off the cobwebs and produced 3 works in just 1 day, normally I only manage one picture a month if that. I still have to work with reference though as I like my work to be precise, but I've been playing about with montages and stuff, flipping and scaling images too, its like been a kid again! I will now take a look at that link. Cheers.

Jules

Selby
10-22-2006, 11:54 PM
I can draw from my mind a lot and have a lot of fun doing that especially im im making art rather than designing...but if i want a really realistic render then i need a refrence to see how things really are...so i dont do silly stuff like stand at ground level and draw the top of a roof on a three story building :oops:


Selby

maror
10-23-2006, 06:25 AM
@royblumenthal

you're right....very good advice.

For myself im not a fan of reference pictures wich are used on the side of the painting...for a realistic painting or when you do a portrait it is in fact necessary but i mostly try to first look at the refree and then drawing it from my mind... and if you wanna do realistic painting always try to remember how it works (light, color, reflections ...) it would help to do more works wich looks real without a refree!

But just for fun use the tips from roy! :lol: It would be even more relaxing...

greez

D Akey
10-23-2006, 06:37 AM
Wow Roy, love that post. I just cut it down for space.

Clever ideas. I was getting liberated just by reading it. :)

New icon? Cool.





5. Look into doing palimpsest work. Make cruddy doodles on one layer, and then completely over-paint them in a top layer. But let the top layer be slightly transparent, so that some of the earlier work shines through. Then see how those things interact, and they might suggest yet another layer on top of both of them.

The idea with all of my suggestions is really for you to take the pressure off yourself. You're NOT required to make a brilliant, saleable artwork when you're working from your imagination. You need to have fun with it. Or have misery. Whatever your need is from art, that's what you've gotta liberate. There are no shoulds.

royblumenthal
10-23-2006, 11:27 AM
Hehehehehehe! Thanks for the enthusiastic response to my thoughts, folk! Very cool of you.

@ D Akey... yup... the new icon is a new self portrait, done, of course, in ArtRage. I actually painted that in about 90 seconds, with about 3-minutes of fine-touching.

I had my tablet pc on an easel in a coffee shop, and the manager wanted to know what I was up to. So I quickly demonstrated.

I was very chuffed that he arrived at that moment, cos the painting is very loose. Which gives me joy

Blue skies
love
Roy

ingie01
10-23-2006, 01:34 PM
All the variety of approaches is indicative of the artistic mind. I hardly ever work without a reference or tracing. My photographic training is nearly impossible to shake. I use all my own photographs then process them(photoshop) before using them in ArtRage 2.
I love the process of creating art , but I am also concerned about how it looks. If it satisfies my photographic/illustrative eye then I post and or keep the composition.

DaveRage
10-24-2006, 01:34 AM
Great thread. I also struggle with drawing from imagination, which is a nuisance, because I really enjoy that the most!

I use references a lot more since I started drawing again, but there's always that nagging little desire to just put them aside and pull stuff straight out of my head. Of course the downside to that is that I don't have the anatomy skills to get that "right", which is frustrating.

I do think that excessive judgement can be a major contributor here. On days where I can just sketch from my head and not really get too concerned about the final result, it's fine. On days where it just has to be "right", not so much :).

Royblumenthal, nice thoughts - I can relate to a lot of that I think