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sweeneymini
09-23-2006, 08:34 PM
Ok doke, monitors use Red Green Blue and real painting uses Yellow Blue Red.

I have a paper wheel for RYB (as yet, un-used :roll) and I use things like - http://wellstyled.com/tools/colorscheme2/index-en.html - for RGB colour schemes.

In last months ImagineFX it referenced the RYB colour wheel but says that each different wheel has its merits. Anyway, that has made me a little confused as to what the differences and merits each wheel type has.

Improv
09-23-2006, 08:45 PM
Ok doke, monitors use Red Green Blue and real painting uses Yellow Blue Red.

I have a paper wheel for RYB (as yet, un-used :roll) and I use things like - http://wellstyled.com/tools/colorscheme2/index-en.html - for RGB colour schemes.

In last months ImagineFX it referenced the RYB colour wheel but says that each different wheel has its merits. Anyway, that has made me a little confused as to what the differences and merits each wheel type has.

This might help:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colour_management

D Akey
09-23-2006, 08:55 PM
Ok doke, monitors use Red Green Blue and real painting uses Yellow Blue Red.

I have a paper wheel for RYB (as yet, un-used :roll) and I use things like - http://wellstyled.com/tools/colorscheme2/index-en.html - for RGB colour schemes.

In last months ImagineFX it referenced the RYB colour wheel but says that each different wheel has its merits. Anyway, that has made me a little confused as to what the differences and merits each wheel type has.

Are you talking about CMYK colors? These are Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black. Get rid of the Black and you have a close relationship to your Yellow Blue Red. Are you using it to refer to the same thing?

The advantages or disadvantages? Not sure about the question. CMYK (color moves away from white when added to) is for print. RGB (moves toward white when added to) is for the monitor.

Print is a different animal. And while you can work on your computer in RGB, when you go to print, you need to convert and tweak it because there will be colors in RGB that do not print as seen. So the computer will pick the next closest color, which could be differnt enough to throw your pic off.

Are we talking about the same thing?

sweeneymini
09-23-2006, 09:29 PM
Thanks Improv, I'll have a proper read of that tomorrow :D

D, I've not explained terrible well :roll:

I'm quite comfortable with additive RGB and I know a little about subtractive CMYK. Its RYB I'm abit confused on. I'll quote the paragraph thats confused me:-


A colour circle, based on red, yellow and blue, is traditional in the field of art. Sir Isaac Newton developed the first circular diagram of colours in 1666. Since then, scientists and artists have studied and designed numerous variations of this concept. Differences of opinion about the validity of one format over another continue to provoke debate. In reality, any colour wheel which presents a locally arranged sequence of pure hues had merit.

Wouldn't all wheels look like a circular rainbow?

Would complementary colours, monochromatic colours etc be the same and calculated the same whether using RGB or RYB?

D Akey
09-24-2006, 01:46 AM
(*** NOTE; I hate when people are talking to me when I'm typing. Some of this post was muddled. I tried to edit it to make more sense.)


I'll take a crack at what they're talking about.

I think what they're talking about is the old style color wheel, though I never heard it called RYB. It was just a plain old color wheel. Black was not usually part of that (Black was a theoretical color on the wheel).

The old color wheel system in the practical world was only good for how to mix a color, and for picking what colors work together. It was a handle for basic color theory aesthetics training.

The rainbow quality I think is pretty universal to color wheels. The greatest purity of colors is on the outside of the circle. So moving laterally, between pure yellow and pure blue you get pure green, etc.

And then going across the circle, if you take any color and add its compliment to it, you start neutralizing the intensity. The mixed colors become grayer the closer to the center where you would have equal parts of the compliments.

Here's where it used to fall apart: If you mixed all the colors, supposedly you get black -- but that wasn't really black, more a dark yucky gray brown. So the theory was lacking a bit in that case.

It's a 'rainbow' (a rich bandwidth of intensity) around the outside rings because the colors are related, as opposed to across the middle.

In modern color pickers like in ArtRage, it's different and far subtler. On computers it's bright color in the rainbowy area, and as a separate slider, you can adjust the light to dark. Works way better.

But there are so many picker types it's hard to generalize how they differ from the old wheel.

> "Would complementary colours, monochromatic colours etc be the same and calculated the same whether using RGB or RYB?"

In essence yes. But it never went to true black.

Is that answer anywhere in the ballpark?

sweeneymini
09-24-2006, 06:51 PM
Thanks guys, I think I get it now :D

Sweedie, that NCS does look like a nice system 8)